How I Plan To Pay My Credit Card Bill Late And Get Away With It

Photo: Flickr via dodgechallenger1

This morning I remembered I had not been checking my “list of what’s due when” (it is a list, of what is due when), so I checked it. I discovered that my Bank of America credit card payment was due today!(My brain thought it was due sometime after the next time I get some money.) But nope: Today. 

The minimum payment is $56. I do not have $56 at this moment. (I will soon. But not right now.)

Up until a few weeks ago, this would not have been a thing, because: Credit cards. I could either pay the bill with billpay, which would then overdraw my checking account, triggering overdraft protection that would transfer funds from my other Visa, or I could get cash from one of my other credit cards and make a payment at a Bank of America branch. These are both stupid things to do, and I won’t be doing them anymore. Though: Not because they are stupid, but because I no longer have credit cards.

Without credit cards, my options are:

1. Wait until I have the money to pay the bill.
2. Borrow $56. 

I started to make a list of who I could borrow money from (recently used possibilities: Mike Dangmy friend Gregmy dad), but then I decided I didn’t particularly want to ask any of them for anything ever again.

So I decided to make a late payment. This is something I never do (I follow some rules). (OK, I follow that one rule.) So: I thought I’d call the bank to see if there was anything else I could do to avoid having a late payment. My plan was three-fold:

1. To tell them to move my payment date.
2. To tell them to not tell the credit agencies I was late.
3. To waive my late fee.

Read the rest of the story on The Billfold > 

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