Here's the secret way you can load the desktop versions of websites on your iPhone

Over the last few years, there have been huge strides in making mobile-friendly versions of websites.

Where previously you were stuck trying to tap a tiny hyperlink in some godforsaken corner of the page if you dared to browse the web on your smartphone, you’re now served with lovely, readable, mobile pages.

But sometimes you just need to access the desktop version. The mobile site might be lacking in functionality, buggy, or impossible to navigate.

You can normally do this by manually searching the mobile website for a link that will take you to its desktop site.

But there’s also a setting hidden in iOS that will immediately serve you up the full desktop site of any website. Here’s how to find it.

First up, navigate to the website you'd like to get the desktop version of.

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Business Insider has a very lovely mobile site, but we show more information -- stock charts, featured stories, etc. -- on our desktop homepage that you might want to view.

Then hit the share button.

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This will bring up the option to tweet the website, share to Facebook, text it to a friend, and so on. But you don't want to do this.

Swipe along the bottom share buttons...

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...Until you find the 'Request Desktop Site' button.

Press it, and...

Voila!

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Just like that, you're greeted with the full desktop version of the website.

It should work for just about any website.

BONUS: You can also get the mobile version of a website while browsing on your desktop.

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Go into the 'Develop' menu, select 'User Agent,' then pick the device you want to mimic.

And just like that you get the mobile version of the site on desktop

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