The 11 Hottest Startups In Northern Europe

Finland’s tech scene is booming.

The country is home to successful companies like Rovio, the maker of Angry Birds, Nokia, and multibillion-dollar gaming company Supercell.

In Finland tech ecosystem alone, the startups are highly supportive of each other.

The Finnish government also provides financial assistance to startups to fuel its ecosystem. Last year, Finnish government-backed public agency Tekes invested 135 million in growth startups. Over the years, it has backed hundreds of companies including Nokia, Rovio, and Supercell.

Finland is also home to Slush, one of the leading startup conferences in Northern Europe and Russia.

Disclosure: Finnish funding agency Tekes and Finnfacts, a non-profit media service organisation in Finland, paid for my trip to Helsinki to explore the startup scene.

IndoorAtlas wants to become the GPS of indoors.

Finnish startup IndoorAtlas wants to become the go-to technology for navigating indoors. If the company gets its way, you'll never get lost inside a mall or department store again.

It maps out indoor locations using the magnetometers already found in your smartphone to detect magnetic anomalies that come from things like steel beams, and other obstructions in inside buildings. IndoorAtlas offers its API to companies and retailers to create indoor-location applications.

IndoorAtlas already has 15 patents filed, and has raised €600,000 in funding.

Jolla is Finland's answer to Android and iPhone.

Jolla, the new Finnish-based smartphone company that spun out of Nokia, just announced at Slush that its first phone will go on sale in Helsinki on November 27.

Back in June, Jolla secured its first mobile phone carrier. Finland's third largest smartphone carrier, DNA, will be the first to sell Jolla's (pronounced Yo-Lah) flagship phone.

The phone features a 4.5-inch display, dual-core processor, microSD expansion with 16GB of storage pre-installed, a 4G modem, and a replaceable battery. Jolla has previously said the device would cost about €399.

To date, Jolla has raised over €200m.

Beddit wants to make your bed smart.

Finnish startup Beddit essentially makes your bed smart. You simply place a super thin film sensor under your bed sheets to track your sleep throughout the night.

The sensor automatically tracks your sleep duration, sleep quality, heart rate, breathing, snoring, and sleeping environment.

Through its mobile app, Beddit provides personalised coaching based on the sleep data. It's currently building out its coaching engine with sleep specialists, Beddit tells Business Insider.

About a month ago, Beddit completed a $US500,000 crowdfunding campaign on IndieGogo.

Ambro wants to make it easy to quickly consume healthy food.

Ambro strives to provide its customers with organic and premium liquid-based food substitutes. It only takes two minutes to prepare the natural smoothie powder.

Its target customers are those who need to get over hunger five minutes before your meeting, but in a nutritional fashion.

PulseOn claims to be the most accurate HR monitor.

PulseOn is a heart rate monitor that you wear on your wrist, as opposed to strapped around your chest. With PulseOn, it's continuously measuring your heart rate, and you don't need a chest strap. The first use case will be for sports and fitness.

PulseOn recently raised €1 million to develop its product for release early next year.

Seriously is a new mobile gaming company.

Petri Järvilehto.

Finnish gaming startup Seriously won't release any titles until next year, but it seems to already be creating a lot of hype in Finland. Just last week, Seriously raised $US2.4 million from Los Angeles-based Upfront Ventures and Scandinavian-based Sunstone Capital.

With Seriously, the idea is to take advantage of the popularity of the 'free-to-play' games and target 'casual plus' gamers, founder Petri Järvilehto tells Business Insider. It wants to create games that people play for days, weeks, months, and even years.

Supercell is one of the hottest gaming startups in the world.

Finnish gaming company Supercell is a $US3 billion company largely in part to the success of its games Hay Day and Clash of Clans.

Clash of Clans and Hay Day are both among the top-10 grossing apps in the iTunes Store, according to AppData. Supercell makes over $US2.4 million per day, on average, according to data released earlier this year.

To date, it has raised over $US272 million.

Weekdone helps teams cross-communicate with each other.

Weekdone wants to help you literally get your week done. It provides managers with weekly employee status reports. The idea is to help different teams understand what everyone else within the company is working on.

Makies lets kids design custom 10-inch action dolls.

Makies harnesses 3D printing to deliver custom-made action toy dolls to its users. Each customer can design their own unique toy. Since these are effectively toys on demand, there's much less waste.

Wayray is basically Google Glass for your car.

Augmented reality car navigation system Wayray wants to make driving natural. It does this by projecting visual routes through your windshield. Wayway costs $US500 and can be installed in any car. For what it's worth, it seems a lot safer than driving with Google Glass, which violates California driving laws.

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David Barrett, founder, Expensify

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