Apple admits its new $350 speaker can leave permanent white rings on wooden surfaces and furniture

Apple
  • Some reviewers of Apple’s new $US350 smart speaker, the HomePod, have noticed that the device can leave behind white rings on some wooden surfaces.
  • Apple confirmed to two outlets that the HomePod could damage oiled wood because of a reaction with the device’s silicone base.
  • While the marks may fade over time, it’s possible the surfaces would need to be refinished to remove the damage.

Early reviewers of Apple’s new HomePod smart speaker have noticed an issue with the $US350 device: It can leave white rings on some wooden surfaces.

Reviewers at Wirecutter and Pocket-lint noticed that the HomePod left behind a semipermanent white ring on some wooden tables and countertops. Both said that the HomePod didn’t leave rings on every type of wooden surface but that it seemed to affect countertops or tables treated with oil.

Apple confirms on its HomePod support page that the device can leave marks on certain wood surfaces due to its “vibration-damping silicone base.” When HomePod is placed on a wood countertop or table that’s been treated with oil, the oils can diffuse between the silicone base and the wooden surface, leaving behind white marks.

Apple says the marks should go away on their own after a few days. If they’re still there, wiping the furniture with a damp cloth or cleaning it “with the manufacturer’s recommended cleaning process” should remove the rings.

If not, refinishing the surface would solve the issue – though that isn’t a great option for anyone with high-end furniture.

As Apple pointed out, this most likely isn’t a HomePod-specific issue. One person on Twitter said that the same thing happened to him while using an Echo Dot and that re-oiling the wood and putting a cork coaster underneath the device solved the issue.

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