A high school football player died after sustaining a severe brain injury

  • Dylan Thomas, a 17-year-old high school student from Georgia, was struck during a football game on September 28 and sustained a serious brain injury, according to reports. He died Sunday night.
  • People are mourning the Pike County High School junior on social media.
  • A Facebook fundraiser in Thomas’ name has raised over $US32,000.

A 17-year-old high school student from Zebulon, Georgia, died Sunday night after sustaining a brain injury during a football game on Friday, The Associated Press reported.

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During the second quarter of a football game on September 28, Dylan Thomas, a junior at Pike County High School, was hit. Thomas later collapsed on the sidelines when his arm and leg went numb, his uncle, Nick Burgess, said. Thomas was then sent to the hospital, where he had two surgeries in an attempt to reduce brain swelling, Fox 5 Atlanta reported.

The teen went into a coma after the operations and died on Sunday night, according to AP.

The Pike County community has come together to mourn Thomas. On Sunday afternoon, the community gathered for a prayer vigil for the teen.

There have also been a number of social media tributes for Thomas.

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A Facebook fundraiser in Thomas’ name had raised more than $US32,000 at the time of this post. Proceeds from the fundraiser will be donated to the “parents of Dylan Thomas to help pay for hospital bills and lost income due to missing work,” according to the Facebook page.

According to an annual report from the National Center for Catastrophic Sport Injury Research, 4 million young people played football in 2017. Of that number, a reported 13 people died. Four died as a direct result of the sport from something like a traumatic injury. Nine died as an indirect result from heat stroke, sudden cardiac arrest, or complications of an infection.

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