Here's the Australian city with the youngest population

Photo by Scott Barbour/Getty Images

The ABS released population data today for the median age of Australians in each capital city, and we’re getting older (slightly).

The data shows that as at June 2016, the median age was 37.2 (up from 36.7 years in 2006).

Here’s how your city compares:

ABS, Business Insider Australia

Darwin’s younger population can be explained in part by its dominant industries — mining and defense, sectors which tend to attract a specific a younger and primarily male demographic.

Which brings us to the next chart, which shows the number of males per 100 females in each capital city:

ABS, Business Insider Australia

As you can see, the type of workers in Darwin’s primary industries make its population demographics significantly different from any other city.

On the other end of the spectrum, Adelaide has the lowest number of males for every 100 females.

According to the ABS, the median age of Australian males was 36.4 years and the median age for females was 38.1.

As at June 2016, females outnumbered males to the tune of 187,100 (12.01 million males against 12.20 million females).

Within the greater area of each capital city, the ABS breaks down the regions by what it calls Statistical Areas, Level 2 (SA2s).

The SA2 with the highest male/female ratio was Howard Springs in Darwin, which is the home of the Darwin Correctional Centre. Mining towns in Western Australia also had significantly higher male populations.

On the other end of the spectrum, Deakin in the ACT and Castle Hill (East) in Greater Sydney had the lowest number of males for every 100 females.

Here are the top five SA2s for the highest and lowest male/female ratios:

Australian Bureau of Statistics

NOW WATCH: Money & Markets videos

Want to read a more in-depth view on the trends influencing Australian business and the global economy? BI / Research is designed to help executives and industry leaders understand the major challenges and opportunities for industry, technology, strategy and the economy in the future. Sign up for free at research.businessinsider.com.au.