Here's how you can simulate climate change at home

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Anyone with an internet connection can now experiment with the impact of climate change, thanks to a model released by researchers at Monash University.

The web-based climate model allows users to see the impact of several climate scenarios, including some established by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change.

For example, here’s what the world will look like in 2095 under one of the IPCC models; a “fairly strong” increase in greenhouse gases due to continued reliance on fossil fuels:

Given this scenario, almost all landmasses will see an average surface temperate increase of 5°C over the 1955 baseline. This is far higher than the international consensus to limit warming to 2°C from pre-industrial levels.

The model has been used for a number of years in universities and high schools, but has been simplified for non-experts, and so it can be run on the web.

“I wanted to develop a realistic climate mode for students and myself that was fast, simple and easy to understand,” said team leader Dietmar Dommenget from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Climate System Science from Monash University

“The model can compute 100,000 years of simulations per day on a laptop. By contrast a more complex Coupled General Circulation Model would compute around 20 years on a supercomputer over the same period.”

“This simple climate model aims to make the processes clearer and help everyone discover how simple alterations in the climate system can have significant impacts,” Dr Dommenget said.

If you want to try experimenting climate change you can find the model on the Monash University website.

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