Here Are All The Hedge Funds That Are Completely Getting Out Of Apple

rotten apple

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A number of hedge funds have completely vacated Apple in the fourth quarter, according to 13Fs filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission.This is significant because the tech giant’s stock is normally a hedge fund favourite.

So far we have four funds that have sold out of their stakes completely in Q4.  

Here’s the rundown: 

  • John Thaler’s JAT Capital exited it position in Apple during Q4.  The fund held 189,098 shares at the end of Q3. 
  • “Tiger Cub” Stephen Mandel dropped his entire Apple stake in the fourth quarter. Lone Pine held more than 805,000 shares at the end of Q3, according to a 13F.
  • Dan Loeb’s Third Point LLC also sold its Apple stake in Q4.  Third Point had 710,000 shares at the end of Q3, according to a 13F filing.
  • “Tiger Cub” Andreas Halvorsen’s Viking Global dumped its entire Apple stake in Q4, the filing shows.  The hedge fund owned 1,094,000 shares at the end of Q3.
  • John Burbank’s Passport Capital sold all its stake in the fourth quarter, according to a 13F. The fund owned 60,736 shares for the quarter ended 9/30/2012, according to a 13F.
  • Eric Mindich’s Eton Park Capital Management sold all of its Apple stake in the fourth quarter, according to a 13F filing with the SEC.  The hedge fund had 250,000 shares at the end of the third-quarter, according to that 13F.
  • Barry Rosenstein’s JANA Partners sold its stake in Q4. At the end of Q3, the hedge fund held 143,148 shares of the tech giant, the Q3 13F filing shows. 
  • Leon Cooperman’s Omega Advisors dumped its stake. He previously had 266,404 shares of the tech giant’s stock at the end of the third quarter, according to a filing. 

We’re going to keep updating this post as the filings come out.

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