Google Sent Its Street View Camera Up Australia's Highest Mountain, Mount Kosciuszko

Image: Supplied.

Google has sent its Street View cameras on a trek up Australia’s highest mountain, Mount Kosciuszko.

Mounted on a National Parks officer’s back, the camera is capturing the experience of walking up the snow capped mountain in southern New South Wales.

At 2228m, Kosciuszko towers above Australia’s ski fields which recently got a dumping of snow after an unseasonably warm start to the winter.

Reaching the summit, which is a relatively easy trek outside the winter months, walkers are greeted with stunning views over parts of the 700,000 hectare Snowy Mountains National Park.

It’s the first National Park expedition the camera has been on in Australia and it plans to cross another 15 areas off the list, including the Blue Mountains and Sydney Harbour National Parks.

The imagery should be available for all to enjoy in the next couple of months.

Google has been documenting some iconic locations around the world using the Street View Trekker including the Grand Canyon, Colorado river, the World Cup stadiums, and Antarctica. You can see some of its expeditions here.

The first Australian “off road” adventure the camera took was back in 2012 when it completed an underwater Street View of Queensland’s Great Barrier Reef. It is also swimming around Sydney Harbour and Bondi Beach at the moment capturing imagery and mapping the underwater ecosystems.

The Google Street View Camera was taken up to Seaman’s Hut which was built in the alpine region about 6 kilometres from Charlottes Pass, to provide shelter for people who may become stranded on the mountain. Image: Supplied.
The camera reached the summit of Kosciuszko. Image: Supplied.

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