Google Has Made More Than 50 Acquisitions This Year -- Here Are The Ones We Know About

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Photo: Dylan Love

Google is on a buying spree.In its 10-Q filing yesterday, Google revealed that it has spent more than $1.4 billion to make 57 acquisitions and “purchases of intangible assets” in the first nine months of this year.

That’s an average of more than six acquisitions per month, or more than one every week.

And that doesn’t even include the proposed buys of Motorola ($12.5 billion) and AdMeld ($400 million), which are still waiting for government approval.

Of those 57 acquisitions, only ITA, Zagat, and Daily Deals were big enough to warrant mention by name. The remaining 54 are “not material” so Google doesn’t have to disclose them in its financial statements.

But the little companies often explain what happened.

So we were able to compile this list of Google acquisitions in 2011 so far.

eBook Technologies, e-reader technology, January 12

It could be used in Google's rumoured Flipboard-killer, Propeller.

Acquisition price unknown.

SayNow, voice messaging, January 25

This small company made its name with apps that let celebrities like Mike Ditka place voice messages on social networks like Facebook, but it also had other technologies for conference calling and son on. It is reportedly being integrated with the Google Voice team.

Price unknown.

fflick, friend-based movie recommendation, January 26

The YouTube group got this one.

TechCrunch reported the acquisition price at about $10 million.

Zynamics, security, March 1

Zynamics provided tools for reverse-engineering pieces of malware (like computer viruses) to figure out how to stop them. The buy was announced on the company's blog.

Price unknown.

BeatThatQuote.com, financial product comparison site, March 7

The company reported a purchase price of 37.7 million U.K. pounds, or about $60 million.

Next New Networks, Web video production and distribution, March 7

The team became part of something called YouTube Next, which is focusing on getting content creators to build more original video for the site.

Price unknown.

Green Parrot Pictures, video editing tools, March 15

YouTube bought this Irish company to help amateurs make better quality videos to post to the site.

Price unknown.

PushLife, music service provider for cell phone companies, April 8

This company made tools that let users sync iTunes libraries with non-Apple phones, and also had some technology that it sold to cellular companies to run their music stores. It will probably be used in Google's music store.

The rumoured price was $25 million.

TalkBin, real-time customer feedback via mobile phones, April 26

TalkBin has technology that lets users send text messages to business owners or customer service reps, who can then respond immediately. It still has its own Web site run by Google, and it's apparently part of the Android team.

Price unknown.

Sparkbuy, comparison shopping for electronic devices, May 23

Google bought this company less than six months after it launched. Its owner, Dan Shapiro (shown here) explained why he sold in a post here.

Price unknown.

PostRank, social media analytics, June 3

This small Canadian startup tracked how messages spread on social networks. It may have contributed to a new Google+ feature called Ripples (shown here) which lets users track the spread of posts across the service.

Price unknown.

AdMeld, display ad optimization, June 9 (pending)

This was a big one -- $400 million. It is still awaiting regulatory approval and hasn't closed yet.

SageTV, TV management software, June 18

This company built apps that let you control your TV from multiple devices and record shows. It was nine years old when Google bought it. It's a safe bet it will be integrated into a future version of Google TV.

Price unknown.

Punchd, digital loyalty-discounts, July 11

Google bought this six-month old startup, which lets users collect digital versions of loyalty cards. It could be used to boost Google Wallet.

Price unknown.

Frid.ge, group social messaging, July 21

This four-person company was part of Y Combinator's 2010 class. It's going to fit into the Google+ team, founder Austin Chang told us.

Price unknown.

PittPatt, facial recognition, July 24

This company started out as a Carnegie Mellon University project, and could be used in a variety of places, such as YouTube or mobile apps.

Price unknown.

Dealmap, daily deals mapping, August 1

This service aggregates daily deals from a bunch of providers and shows them on a map so you can see where there are deals near you. It had more than 2 million users when Google bought it, and will presumably fit into the company's Offers service.

Price unknown.

Motorola, wireless phones and TV set top boxes (and patents), August 15 (pending)

This was the big kahuna, and will cost $12.5 billion whenever it closes. Google said it bought Motorola mainly to offer patent protection to Android resellers, but it could also use Motorola to get more directly into the phone and TV hardware business.

The deal is expected to close late this year or early in 2012.

Zave Networks, digital coupons and loyalty programs, September 2

Zave was six years old at the time of the deal. The team will probably become part of Google Wallet.

Price unknown.

Zagat, restaurant guides, September 8

This goes down as a 'material' acquisition so Google had to report its price: $151 million in cash. It will help boost the company's local commerce products.

Daily Deals, a German Groupon clone, September 19

This Groupon clone was also big enough to be 'material,' so Google had to report its price: $114 million in cash.

PLUS ONE MORE: SocialGrapple, Twitter analytics, October 11

This didn't fit into the first three quarters, but Google bought this Twitter social analytics company just a couple weeks ago.

Price unknown.

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