Goldman Sachs CEO Lloyd Blankfein hints at support for a 2nd Brexit referendum

  • Goldman Sachs CEO Blankfein tweets his support for a second Brexit referendum.
  • Blankfein said he favoured a “confirming vote” on what he called a “monumental and irreversible decision” by the British people.
  • Blankfein has now intervened several times on the Brexit debate through Twitter.

LONDON — Goldman Sachs CEO Lloyd Blankfein on Thursday hinted at support for a second Brexit referendum in a 264-character tweet.

Taking advantage of Twitter’s new 280-character tweet limit, Blankfein said he favoured a “confirming vote” on what he called a “monumental and irreversible decision” by the British people.

“Here in UK, lots of hand-wringing from CEOs over #Brexit. Better sense of the tough and risky road ahead. Reluctant to say, but many wish for a confirming vote on a decision so monumental and irreversible. So much at stake, why not make sure consensus still there?” — Blankfein tweeted.

Thursday’s tweet is the third time in just a few weeks that Blankfein —  one of the most influential figures in banking — has taken to the microblogging site to comment on Britain’s upcoming exit from the EU.

In mid-October Blankfein spelled out the bank’s post-Brexit plans for Europe in a Tweet.

“Just left Frankfurt,” he tweeted. “Great meetings, great weather, really enjoyed it. Good, because I’ll be spending a lot more time there. #Brexit.”

Eleven days later he posted again about the bank’s post-Brexit plans in the UK, saying that “so much” is outside its control when it comes to the UK’s exit from the bloc.

“In London. GS still investing in our big new Euro headquarters here. Expecting/hoping to fill it up, but so much outside our control.#Brexit” — he said in the tweet.

Get the latest Goldman Sachs stock price here.

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