GitHub's CEO is stepping down for the second time

Chris WanstrathGitHubChris Wanstrath is stepping down as CEO of GitHub.

GitHub CEO Chris Wanstrath will step down from his role as soon as he finds a replacement.

Wanstrath, one of three founders of the popular development platform for computer programmers, announced his plan at an all-hands meeting in San Francisco on Thursday, where the company was celebrating its passing of the $US200 million revenue mark, according to Forbes, which first reported the news.

Wanstrath will become executive chairman once a replacement is found.

The move will mark the second time that Wanstrath has stepped down from the CEO role. He was the company’s first CEO, but was replaced in 2012 by fellow co-founder Tom Preston-Werner. When Preston-Warner resigned in 2014 following an investigation into gender based harassment, Wanstrath returned to the CEO role (the company later said the investigation found no evidence of illegal practices, according to the New York Times).

Wanstrath confirmed his latest move in an emailed statement to Business Insider.

“As GitHub approaches 700 employees, with more than $US200M in ARR, accelerating growth, and more than 20 million registered users, I’m confident that this is the moment to find a new CEO to lead us into the next stage of growth. I will remain CEO during the search and will work closely alongside the Board to identify and hire the right leader that will help GitHub achieve its full potential. Once we welcome our new CEO, I will continue to play an important role in our development and will remain Executive Chairman. What we’ve accomplished over the past 10 years at GitHub has been mind-blowing, and I can’t wait to see what we can accomplish over the next decade.”

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