German Coalition Lawmakers Are Now Advocating A Greek Exit From The Eurozone

bundestag

Photo: MacMANU  on flickr

According to German newspaper Handelsblatt, members of the ruling German coalition now believe that Greece should be able to leave the euro currency if it wants to.The report cites Christian Democratic Union MP Klaus-Peter Willsch, though seems to imply that other politicians might share his views.

Here’s the notable passage, via our kind German translator @andrs_mr:

Politicians of the black-yellow coalition (>CDU/CSU=black, FDP=yellow) no longer want to stand at the sideline and watch the fuzz. Given the unclear political situation in Greece they are advocating the exit of the crisis stricken Mediterranean country out of the eurozone. “We shall offer Greece an orderly exit of the eurozone, without an exit of the European Union”, said CDU budget expert Klaus-Peter Willsch to Handelsblatt online. It’s not for the Germans to dictate the Greeks how they should live. Sunday’s election result could lead to the conclusion that the Greek people is not willing to bear the substantial efforts which are necessary to lead the country to competitiveness. The dogma, that no country should leave the eurozone, has already resulted in too much damage in European policies” , Mr Willsch added. The introduction of a new currency is often experienced before. “It offers also Greece more chances instead of a stubborn continuation of its way on the wrong track”

Not all coalition members are on board, however. The article continues (via Google Translate):

The vice chairman of the CDU parliamentary group, Michael Meister said, though, that it was not the aim of the EU partners, Greece expelled from the euro area. “However, it is clear when the new Greek government, contrary to expectations, the contracts comply, they will have to answer the announced consequences,” said the CDU politician.

Check out the full article (in German) here.

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