'A s---show in a dumpster fire': Attorney George Conway, husband of Kellyanne Conway, rails against the Trump administration

Chip Somodevilla/Getty ImagesAttorney George T. Conway III, husband of White House Counselor to the President Kellyanne Conway, on the South Lawn of the White House, April 17, 2017.
  • Attorney George Conway, husband of White House counselor Kellyanne Conway, railed against the Republican Party and President Donald Trump during an interview with Yahoo News.
  • “I don’t feel comfortable being a Republican anymore,” Conway said on a Yahoo News podcast. “I think the Republican Party has become something of a personality cult.”
  • Conway, who declined an offer to lead the Justice Department’s civil division in June 2017, said he had reservations about taking a role within the Trump administration, which he described as a “s—show in a dumpster fire.”

Attorney George Conway, husband of White House counselor Kellyanne Conway, railed against the Republican Party and President Donald Trump during an interview with Yahoo News’ podcast “Skullduggery.”

“I don’t feel comfortable being a Republican anymore,” Conway said on the podcast. “I think the Republican Party has become something of a personality cult.”

Conway described Trump’s tweets criticising Attorney General Jeff Sessions and the ongoing indictments of Republican lawmakers Duncan Hunter and Chris Collins as “appalling,” and a sharp deviation from political norms.

“We’re talking about someone who has sworn an oath to uphold the Constitution and laws of the United States,” Conway said, “and to criticise the attorney general for permitting justice to be done without regard to political party is very disturbing.”

Conway, a litigator for the New York-based law firm Wachtell, Lipton, Rosen & Katz, was reportedly the front-runner candidate to lead the Justice Department’s civil division. Conway declined the offer in June 2017, saying at the time that although he would “continue to support the president and his administration,” it was not “the right time to leave the private sector.”

Conway said he had reservations about Trump’s relationship with the Justice Department as he was considering the offer.

“I’m filling out the financial forms and it’s like – I forget what time of year it was, it was like late April – man, I’m thinking,” Conway said on “Skullduggery.”

“I’m watching this thing, and it’s like the administration is like a s—show in a dumpster fire. And I’m like, ‘I don’t want to do that. I don’t know.'”

“And then you got the Comey firing, and then you got [Trump] going on TV saying, ‘I had Russia on my mind,’ and it’s like, ‘Oh, no,'” Conway said, referring to Trump’s 2017 firing of FBI director James Comey, who was investigating Russia’s meddling in the 2016 US presidential election.

“And then I’m driving home one day from New York, and it’s like ‘Robert Mueller appointed special counsel,’ and then I realised, this guy is going to be at war with the Justice Department.”

Conway has not been shy about his views toward the Trump administration. In tweets and opinion columns, he has criticised the Trump White House in matters relating to the Justice Department and jurisprudence, among other things.

This week, Conway organised a high-profile group of conservative and libertarian attorneys called “Checks and Balances,” which provided “a voice and a network for like-minded attorneys” who believe the Trump administration has compromised the rule of law.

Conway said he considers Trump to be “the lesser evil” when compared to Hillary Clinton, as part of his calculus on voting for him in the 2016 presidential election. Conway said he was unsure whether he would vote for him again, adding that “If faced with the choice again, I’d probably move to Australia.”

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