THE FUTURE OF APPLE

Piper Jaffray analyst Gene Munster spoke at Business Insider’s IGNITION conference today to go over his predictions for Apple for the next few years.

On the roadmap: new iPhones and iPads of course.

But a lot of the focus was on Apple’s plans for a television, smart watch, and Web-connected devices in the home.

This is his exclusive presentation.

This is Gene Munster's presentation. Click through to see Apple's plans for the future.

Some legal stuff ...

Now let's talk about Apple.

Teens love their iPhones. 8600 teenagers were surveyed and 65% said their next phone will be an iPhone. That's up 3% from the Spring.

Here's the consumer sentiment ...

... and on social media.

We should expect the next iPhone to be launched in the middle of 2014.

Munster said innovation around the iPad 'has been difficult'.

The next iPad could have a bigger screen, and there could be more variety. 'Two sizes don't fit all,' Munster says.

The Apple TV! Lots of buzz always generates when people talk about the idea of the Apple TV.

Munster notes he hasn't always been right with his predictions.

There is a video here. 14 people were surveyed about whether they would be an Apple TV or not. 7 said yes, 5 said no, and 2 said maybe.

Munster said the projected $US1700 price tag for the Apple TV would be a deterrent.

Expect the Apple TV in 2014.

The Apple iWatch.

There is a video here. The majority of people said they wouldn't buy an Apple watch. 'It seems like a guy thing,' one woman said.

Expect the Apple iWatch in 2014.

Expect a Payments platform in 2015.

People were asked what they wanted from Apple. The answer? Pretty much everything.

Munster 30

Is it 2014 yet?

Munster 33

Munster 34

More from IGNITION 2013...

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