Fred Wilson Likes Silicon Alley Insider, Hates Name

Fredwilson

Venture capitalist and A VC author Fred Wilson has weighed in on us: He likes our site–especially our industry analysis and Community Twitter–and loathes the term “Silicon Alley.”  He has therefore re-christened us the Insider.

Bad news first: Fred hates the term “Silicon Alley” because he feels it implies permanent “Us, too!”-ness unbecoming to a community located at the centre of the universe.  We hear him on that one: Given the diversity and density of media, advertising, finance, tech, investment, start-up, and other digital-centric industries in this city, New York need kowtow to nowhere.  That said, to our ears, the term “Silicon Alley” has long since stopped having “me too” connotations and developed its own sense of place.  (And we wouldn’t live/work anywhere else.)  In any case, now that hundreds of folks have linked to our site (thank you!), we’re stuck with the name–or at least URL (blame Google).  So there you have it.

On to the Community Twitter room.  First, Fred wants you all to join, which we hope you will (just send your handle to [email protected] and we’ll sign you right up. Also, full disclosure: Fred’s firm, Union Square Ventures, is an investor in Twitter).  Second, he wants us to call it the Water Cooler, which we’re happy to consider doing (thoughts?).  Third, he wants us to reformat the page by latest tweet instead of by person and also make it into a feed.  We’ll get on both.

Lastly, Fred notes that traffic on SAI has now passed traffic on Fred’s highly respected and well-read A VC blog.  This is a great relief.  Why?  Because, unlike Fred, we don’t happen to also be founding partners in a wildly successful venture capital firm.

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