I flew on JetBlue founder’s David Neeleman’s new airline and saw how it’s nothing like his old one – but it isn’t supposed to be

Breeze Airways Inaugural Flight
The inaugural flight of David Neeleman’s Breeze Airways. Thomas Pallini/Insider
  • Breeze Airways is the latest brainchild of JetBlue Airways founder David Neeleman.
  • The two airlines couldn’t be any more different, however, despite having the same founder.
  • Breeze’s strategy is completely diffeent from JetBlue but still works even though it offers a different product.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

JetBlue Airways revolutionized air travel in the US when it launched in 2000, at the turn of the century.
JetBlue Airways
JetBlue Airways planes. Fred Prouser/Reuters
Seat-back television screens, complimentary snacks, and low fares were the airline’s norm, and customers loved it.
JetBlue Airways
JetBlue Airways is known for in-flight entertainment. Lucas Jackson/Reuters
Behind the now 21-year-old company was David Neeleman, a serial aviation entrepreneur with successful airline startups in three countries.
David Neeleman JetBlue
JetBlue Airways founder David Neeleman. AP
Four airlines later, Neeleman’s latest endeavor is Breeze Airways, an ultra-low-cost carrier looking to fill the gaps left by the nation’s largest airlines. Breeze launched its first flights in May and has been steadily expanding up and down the East Coast and inland as far as San Antonio, Texas.
Breeze Airways Inaugural Flight David Neeleman
The inaugural flight of David Neeleman’s Breeze Airways. Thomas Pallini/Insider
Despite Neeleman at the wheel, Breeze is nothing like JetBlue. You won’t find seat-back screens or the famous Terra Blues chips on Breeze’s shiny blue planes, but that’s not the point of the airline.
Breeze Airways Inaugural Flight
The inaugural flight of David Neeleman’s Breeze Airways. Thomas Pallini/Insider
I took a flight on Breeze Airways and found out why it’s not supposed to be JetBlue 2.0.
Breeze Airways Inaugural Flight
The inaugural flight of David Neeleman’s Breeze Airways. Thomas Pallini/Insider
Breeze Airways launched in late May with an opening salvo of 39 initial routes from bases in Tampa, Florida; Charleston, South Carolina; New Orleans, Louisiana; and Norfolk, Virginia.
The Breeze Airways route map.
The route map. Breeze Airways
Unlike JetBlue, Breeze’s strategy targets underserved cities and primarily creates new air routes where none currently exist.
Breeze Airways Inaugural Flight
The inaugural flight of David Neeleman’s Breeze Airways. Thomas Pallini/Insider
The very first Breeze flight flew from Tampa to Charleston, for example, on a route that sees limited service by only one other airline. Flying between these two cities solely on JetBlue would require a stop in New York or Boston.
Breeze Airways Inaugural Flight
The inaugural flight of David Neeleman’s Breeze Airways. Thomas Pallini/Insider
Breeze’s bread and butter, at the moment, are routes that are less than two hours in duration. Convenience is the name of the game and connecting flights are non-existent.
Breeze Airways Inaugural Flight
The inaugural flight of David Neeleman’s Breeze Airways. Thomas Pallini/Insider
In terms of pricing, Breeze’s introductory fares start at $US39 ($AU53) for a basic fare that only includes a ticket to ride and a personal item to carry onboard the plane. It’s comparable to JetBlue’s basic economy fare.
Breeze Airways fare structure
An overview of Breeze Airways’ fare structure. Thomas Pallini/Insider via Breeze Airways
While not all tickets will be sold for $US39 ($AU53), the idea is to keep fares low to stimulate demand.
Breeze Airways Inaugural Flight
The inaugural flight of David Neeleman’s Breeze Airways. Thomas Pallini/Insider
But Breeze’s low prices come with trade-offs, primarily in the onboard and customer service experience.
Breeze Airways
pilots. Breeze Airways
Breeze, most notably, doesn’t have a phone number. Customers are encouraged to send a message or email the airline but calling isn’t really an option.
Breeze Airways app
The strategy helps keep costs low by reducing Breeze’s overall infrastructure and staffing, which is typical for an ultra-low-cost airline.
Breeze Airways Inaugural Flight
The inaugural flight of David Neeleman’s Breeze Airways. Thomas Pallini/Insider
Technology also plays a large role with nearly everything able to be done from the airline’s mobile application. Neeleman initially described Breeze as a “high-tech company that just happens to fly airplanes” and this is one way of scaling back on staff levels.
Breeze Airways Inaugural Flight
The inaugural flight of David Neeleman’s Breeze Airways. Thomas Pallini/Insider
The tech-focused strategy does help keep costs down, which are passed on to the consumer in low airfares, but experts say it might not jive well with less tech-focused customers.
Breeze Airways Inaugural Flight
The inaugural flight of David Neeleman’s Breeze Airways. Thomas Pallini/Insider
JetBlue, alternatively, does have a phone number in addition to a messaging feature on its mobile application.
JetBlue Airways baggage
JetBlue passengers checking in luggage. Chris O’Meara/AP
In another ultra-low-cost trade-off, in-flight entertainment on Breeze is currently only available through mobile device streaming, and the service isn’t yet offered on the Embraer E195 fleet.
Breeze Airways Inaugural Flight
The inaugural flight of David Neeleman’s Breeze Airways. Thomas Pallini/Insider
In-flight WiFi, another JetBlue staple, also isn’t available on Breeze’s Embraer fleet. That will come when the Airbus A220s arrive but it likely won’t be free, as JetBlue’s is.
Breeze Airways Inaugural Flight
The inaugural flight of David Neeleman’s Breeze Airways. Thomas Pallini/Insider
But again, that’s part and parcel of flying an ultra-low-cost airline. You get what you pay for.
Breeze Airways Inaugural Flight
The inaugural flight of David Neeleman’s Breeze Airways. Thomas Pallini/Insider
Breeze is offering snacks for the time being but the airline will move to a buy-on-board program where all snacks and drinks will require a purchase. The current offering includes Utz chips and a Kind bar.
Breeze Airways Inaugural Flight
The inaugural flight of David Neeleman’s Breeze Airways. Thomas Pallini/Insider
One thing that was surprisingly similar between the two airlines was Breeze’s choice of aircraft for its first flights. The Embraer E190/E195 family of aircraft was tapped to initially power Breeze’s fleet, with second-hand models coming from Air Canada and Neeleman’s Azul Brazilian Airlines.
Breeze Airways Inaugural Flight
The inaugural flight of David Neeleman’s Breeze Airways. Thomas Pallini/Insider
Frequent JetBlue flyers will surely recognize the aircraft as the E190 variant powers JetBlue’s short-haul network. The E195 is near identical, albeit slightly longer.
JetBlue Embraer E190
A JetBlue Embraer E190 aircraft. Nicolas Economou/NurPhoto/Getty
Breeze will soon fly the Airbus A220-300, an aircraft type that just joined the JetBlue fleet in December.
JetBlue Airways Airbus A220-300 Flight
Flying on a JetBlue Airways Airbus A220-300. Thomas Pallini/Insider
On the inside of the E195, it was hard to tell the difference from JetBlue’s interiors on the aircraft.
Breeze Airways Inaugural Flight
The inaugural flight of David Neeleman’s Breeze Airways. Thomas Pallini/Insider
Standard legroom seats had nearly the same look as those found on JetBlue. There was one glaring omission, however, in the form of seat-back entertainment screens.
Breeze Airways Inaugural Flight
The inaugural flight of David Neeleman’s Breeze Airways. Thomas Pallini/Insider
Legroom varies from aircraft to aircraft on Breeze and standard economy seats on the E195 aircraft do match JetBlue’s 32 inches (81cm) of pitch in economy. That may soon change, however, as Breeze standardizes its seat product.
Breeze Airways Inaugural Flight
The inaugural flight of David Neeleman’s Breeze Airways. Thomas Pallini/Insider
E190 aircraft offer 29 inches (74cm) of pitch in a standard offering for an ultra-low-cost airline.
Breeze Airways Inaugural Flight
The inaugural flight of David Neeleman’s Breeze Airways. Thomas Pallini/Insider
The seats also had the same feel as a JetBlue Embraer E190 seat. I’ve spent a lot of time flying on that aircraft and if it weren’t for the lack of televisions, I probably couldn’t tell the difference.
Breeze Airways Inaugural Flight
The inaugural flight of David Neeleman’s Breeze Airways. Thomas Pallini/Insider
But perhaps the most important difference between the two airlines is that Breeze and JetBlue don’t compete on the same routes. Breeze primarily flies to underserved cities and routes such as Oklahoma City-San Antonio; Norfolk-Columbus, Ohio; and Hartford, Connecticut-Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.
Breeze Airways Inaugural Flight
The inaugural flight of David Neeleman’s Breeze Airways. Thomas Pallini/Insider
JetBlue, for its part, primarily operates a hub-and-spoke network with bases in East Coast cities like New York, Boston, and Fort Lauderdale, Florida. Most Breeze customers don’t even have JetBlue as a choice for those routes without connecting somewhere.
JetBlue Airways Long Beach
JetBlue aircraft in Long Beach. Reed Saxon/AP
So while the offering might be bare-bones, customers in underserved markets are getting cheap access to non-stop flights, something that JetBlue isn’t currently offering at a widespread level.
Breeze Airways Inaugural Flight
The inaugural flight of David Neeleman’s Breeze Airways. Thomas Pallini/Insider
And for many, trading high-tech planes for convenience is a compromise worth making, especially when the price is right.
Breeze Airways Inaugural Flight David Neeleman
The inaugural flight of David Neeleman’s Breeze Airways. Thomas Pallini/Insider