Colorado Couple Builds An Incredible Treehouse Village In Costa Rica

finca

Photo: Used with permission from Erica Hogan

Erica and Matt Hogan never intended to walk away with 600 acres of wild rainforest when they went shopping for a little piece of Costa Rica to call their own in 2006. They happened upon a slice of land that was marketed as a potential harvesting site (i.e.: prime for deforestation) and decided to save it from the chopping block.

Click here to see what they created > 
“[The land] felt really sacred from the get-go and we felt like this would be a travesty to let this be deforested,” Erica told Business Insider.  “It was bigger than what we were intending to purchase initially. And one night I just thought, well there are some really cool trees on that property. What if we built treehouses?”  

The idea became Finca Bellavista, an epic undertaking that’s become a thriving treehouse village, where the locals bounce door-to-door on ziplines and dinner is grown in everyone’s backyard.

“It’s a labour of love and it’s more than just our business,” she says. “It’s our life.”

Here's the finca's base camp and community centre at dusk. They form the centrepiece of the property and include a dining hall, an open-air lounge, a WIFI zone, a rancho, a bathhouse, a campfire ring and a wedding garden.

Photo by Allison Shelley

Photo by Anders Birch

Photo by Tim Hussin

Photo by Erica Hogan

Photo by Tim Hussin

Photo by Anders Birch

These aren't anything like what mum and Dad might cobble together for their kids in the backyard. They function exactly like homes, with indoor plumbing, running water and fully operating kitchens.

Photo by Anders Birch

Photo by Tim Hussin

It also doubles as a local playground.

The bird-watching opportunities are endless.

Photo by Matt Hogan

Each treehouse owner is free to rent their space to outsiders. The Hogans didn't anticipate running a village of renters, but they changed their minds when owners expressed interest.

Photo by Erica Hogan

Photo by Matt Hogan

Photo by Tim Hussin

About the zip-lining. The finca boasts an intricate web of zip line cables (called SKYTrails), which homeowners use as a sort of private transportation network. They rent the equipment from the main office.

Photo by Tim Hussin

Finca residents zoom through the canopy. In the background is the Mis Ojos treehouse.

Photo by Allison Shelley

Old-school wooden bridges help keep people connected, too.

Photo by Bryan Beasley

Photo by Erica Hogan

Photo by Erica Hogan

Not every country's quite as accepting of green homes as Costa Rica...

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