17 Facts About Those Tiny Falkland Islands That Argentina And The UK Are Fighting Over

Penguins Falkland Islands

Photo: flickr: Liam Q

The Argentinian-UK spat over the Falkland Islands seems to show no signs of abating, with UN chief Ban Ki-moon today calling on both nations to avoid “escalation”, the BBC reports.So what’s so special about the Falkland Islands that has made both countries enter a war of words just 30 years after an actual war?

The islands are about 4,700 square miles big.

That's around 1,000 square miles smaller than Connecticut.

The last census recorded only 2,955 people on the island.

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90% of the island claims British birth or descent.

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There are 500,000 sheep on the island,

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There is only one town, Stanley.

2,115 people lived in the town, according to a 2006 census.

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English is the official language, though there is a small number of Spanish speakers. Many people on the island learn Spanish as their second language.

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There are 7 pubs on the island. They do not serve pints, only bottles.

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Phone numbers are only 5 digits long.

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The country has had mobile phones since 2005.

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There are no chain stores on the island.

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There are no ATMs on the island, and just one bank.

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There are few trees on the island.

The only trees that do exist have been imported.

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The country has a surprisingly high rate of immigration.

The islands are well known for their nature.

80% of the world's breeding population of Black-Browed Albatross are on the island.

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Five different types of penguin breed on the island.

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The country is still littered with mines from the last war 1982.

Oil companies have huge hopes for the island's offshore oil reserves.

One company, Rockhopper, is investing $100 million in one field where oil has been discovered. It's thought that a discovery in the region could treble the UK's oil reserves.

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