Facebook has won a legal battle in China against a company that wants to make a drink called 'face book'

Mark Zuckerberg Facebook ChinaFacebook/Mark ZuckerbergFacebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg on the Great Wall of China.

Facebook has won a rare trademark court case in China against a drinks company that tried to name one of its beverages “face book.”

The Beijing court ruled that Zhongshan Pearl River Drinks — incorporated in south east China in 2014 — had “violated moral principles” with “obvious intention to duplicate and copy from another high-profile trademark,” according to the BBC.

The ruling was made on April 28 but not widely reported in English.

By contrast, Apple lost a court case last week against a local company that wanted to name its leather goods after the iPhone, according to The Guardian.

The Chinese government has blocked Facebook — a platform that allows people to voice their opinions and speak freely — in China for several years. The court ruling could be seen as a sign that the communist country is considering taking a less strict stance on Mark Zuckerberg’s social network.

Following the court decision, local media speculated whether Beijing was about to loosen the restrictions on Facebook, the BBC reported.

Zuckerberg, who has been learning Mandarin, visited China in March and met with the country’s propaganda chief, Liu Yunshan, as well as Jack Ma, the billionaire founder of ecommerce platform Alibaba. While in China, Zuckerberg went for a run through Beijing’s Tienanmen Square, which is heavily polluted. He was criticised for not wearing a mask as he ran with a group through the smoggy city.

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