Here are the new emojis coming to Facebook Messenger

Facebook is rolling out a new set of standardised emojis in Messenger this Thursday, including 1,500 that are re-designed and 100 newcomers.

In an effort to “make emojis more representative of the world we live in,” the newest designs will feature alternative genders and more women emojis.

And, following Apple and Slack’s lead, Messenger is finally introducing skin tone customisation for the first time.

Check out the latest designs below:

Users can either set a specific shade as their default ...

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... or long press on individual emojis and select from the menu of skin tones for exact customisation.

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Also, similar to Google's latest emoji update, Facebook is introducing more women in empowering roles, including emojis of a female police officer ...

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...runner, and swimmer...

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... runner, swimmer ...

... and a surfer, with more to come.

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and surfer, with more to come.

Another long-awaited update, Facebook has standardised Messenger's emojis to ensure that they look the same across all platforms. So, an Android user will nevermore receive 'broken-looking black boxes or emojis that just don't make sense' from an iOS device, and vise versa.

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Also on all platforms, the Messenger composer now makes it 'easier than ever to toggle in between the regular text keyboard and the emoji keyboard.'

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These newest designs will be available on most Android devices and web products. According to Facebook, nearly 10 per cent of all messages exchanged in its popular chat application include emojis. Now they're finally starting to look more like their diverse fanbase.

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