A photographer exploded a bunch of supercars to show what's inside

Fabian Oefner thought about becoming a car designer. But he decided he was better suited for art.

“I found out there are too many other things that I like better, so I chose a different path,” Oefner said in an interview.

The Swiss artist is best known for his “Disintegrating” photos, which show super cars exploding into hundreds of parts.

Disintegrating No. 1Fabian Oefner, ‘Disintegrating’Mercedes-Benz 300 SLR Uhlenhaut CoupĂ© with gullwing doors (1954)

He pulls off the illusion with a time-consuming process. He starts with a sketch. He works with model makers at Amalgam to create perfect scale models of the cars that include internal parts. He disassembles the model and photographs every piece at a precise angle. He combines all the shots together digitally.

“It’s a combination between love of cars and … the idea of stopping time,” Oefner said.

Oefner says he selected standout cars from history to feature in the shots. As for why he chose older models: “The technology is more appealing to the human eye when you look at the older cars.” Plus, he says, “it’s very difficult to get the models from newer cars.”

“Disintegrating — Part II,” a follow-up to a 2013 batch, is currently on display at
M.A.D. Gallery spaces in Taipei and Geneva. See some highlights below.

Disintegrating No. 1

Mercedes-Benz 300 SLR Uhlenhaut Coupé with gullwing doors (1954)

Disintegrating No. 2

Ferrari 330 P4 (1967)

Disintegrating No. 3

Jaguar E-Type (1961)

Disintegrating No. 4

Audi Auto Union Type C (1936-1937)

Disintegrating No. 5

Maserati 250F (1957)

Disintegrating No. 6

Ford GT40 (1969)

Disintegrating No. 7

Bugatti 57 SC (1934-1940)

Disintegrating No. 8

Porsche 956 (1982)

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