The First Ever Email, The First Tweet, And 13 Other Famous Internet Firsts

The first photo ever uploaded to the Internet.When was the first email sent, and who sent it?

What was the first ad to ever run on a web page?

How about the first picture uploaded to the Internet?

Here are 15 famous Internet firsts that were monumental in shaping web history.

We can blame ARPANET for the first spam email, which was sent to 393 people on May 3, 1978.

The first domain name ever registered was Symbolics.com on March 15, 1985. Now it serves as a historic site.

The first website was dedicated to information about the World Wide Web and went live on August 6, 1991. Here's the url: http://info.cern.ch/hypertext/WWW/TheProject.html.

The first picture ever uploaded on the web was posted by Tim Burners Lee (the founder of the Internet) on behalf of a comedy band called Les Horrible Cernettes.

His wife replied, 'Wow ... this is so cool!' Leonsis later became AOL's Vice Chairman.

Joe McCambley ran the first banner ad ever online. It went live in October 1994 on HotWired.com and it promoted 7 art museums, sponsored by AT&T.

The first item sold on eBay (back then it was AuctionWeb) was a broken laser pointer for $14.83 in 1995. The man who bought it told founder Pierre Omidyar he collected broken laser pointers.

The first book purchased on Amazon was Douglas Hofstadter's Fluid Concepts and Creative Analogies: Computer Models of the Fundamental Mechanisms of Thought in 1995.

Mark Zuckerberg was the first person on Facebook with ID number 4 (the first three Facebook accounts were used for testing). The first non-founder to join Facebook was Arie Hasit (below), who is now in Israel studying to be a rabbi.

The first YouTube video posted was posted by co-founder Jawed Karim at the San Diego Zoo. It was uploaded on April 23, 2005 and has been watched nearly 10 million times.

The first tweet was written by co-founder Jack Dorsey on March 21, 2006.

Bonus: The first commercial cell phone call ever made was in 1983. It was placed by Bob Barnett who was president of Ameritech. Video of the call is below.

Bonus: The first-ever Business Insider article (then Silicon Alley Insider) was published on May 16, 2007 by Editor in Chief, Henry Blodget.

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