A major drugmaker is crashing nearly 40% due to 'substantial challenges'

Prescription, medication, pharmaceuticals, pills, medicineRob Kim/Getty Images For alice + olivia by Stacey BendetA pill bottle installation on display at the alice + olivia by Stacey Bendet Fall 2016 presentation at The Gallery, Skylight at Clarkson Sq on February 16, 2016 in New York City.

Endo Internationals’ stock is tanking after the company cautioned investors about a tough year ahead.

The generics drugmaker of such pharmaceuticals as Percocet painkillers, is facing a drop in pricing power and scrutiny over its business model, sending the stock sliding.

The company has drawn comparisons to troubled pharma company Valeant, which has caused its shares to already dive from $84.64 a share on May 6, 2015 to $26.59 as of Thursday’s close.

This was driven by continued pricing and competitive pressures on our commoditized and pain products.

“To begin, I will provide a snapshot of our first quarter financial results, which despite some headwinds were largely in line with our expectations,” said Endo CEO Rajiv De Silva on the company’s quarterly earnings call. “However, these headwinds have created substantial challenges to overcome in the remainder of the year.”

The challenges led the company to report dismal guidance of earnings per share between $4.50 and $4.80 a share for the full year 2016 versus estimates of $5.69 per share. The company did beat on both first quarter earnings per share, ($1.08 a share against $1.05 a share expected.

The move Friday has dropped the stock by nearly 40% at $16.50 a share as of 11:03 a.m. ET.

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