Elon Musk says he's going to address one of the biggest problems with electric cars today

One of the biggest problems with electric cars is “range anxiety,” which occurs when electric car owners worry that their car won’t be able to last until the next charge.

On Sunday, Tesla CEO Elon Musk tweeted that he would address this problem in relation to Tesla’s Model S sedan at a press conference on Thursday. 

In terms of range anxiety, the Model S is already pretty solid. 

The Model S comes in four variations, delivering ranges of between 208 and 270 miles per charge, according to Tesla. That is far better than the ranges of other electric vehicles on the market, most of which deliver ranges of less than 100 miles per charge.

And Tesla continues to expand its extensive network of supercharger stations, which provide free high-speed recharging to Tesla owners for life. As Tesla steadily fills the supercharger gaps, at least in the US, then range anxiety diminishes.

Musk tesla model sREUTERS/Stephen LamTesla Motors CEO Elon Musk speaks next to the company’s newest Model S during the Model S Beta Event held at the Tesla factory in Fremont, California October 1, 2011. The Model S is the company’s first full-size electric sedan set for release in 2012.

The update could entail a number of things. For instance, it could better distribute the existing power in the Tesla Model S, or provide more accurate warning systems to quell driver concerns about existing limitations, or something else entirely.

In January, the company released a software update that made the Tesla’s top-of-the-line Model S, the P85D, significantly faster. And 

 Musk gave some more details on Tuesday:

Musk has been criticised for tweeting out veiled announcements at odd hours and not quite delivering. We shall see!

Matthew Debord and Taylor Lorenz contributed to this report.

NOW WATCH: This is what happens to your brain and body when you check your phone before bed

NOW WATCH: Tech Insider videos

Business Insider Emails & Alerts

Site highlights each day to your inbox.

Follow Business Insider Australia on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, and Instagram.