Elizabeth Warren brought down the house at CNN's LGBTQ town hall with a fiery answer on same-sex marriage

Screenshot via CNNElizabeth Warren.
  • Sen. Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts brought down the house at Thursday night’s series of CNN town halls on LGBTQ rights.
  • The town-hall event spanned several hours, but Warren had the line of the night when Morgan Cox, a Texas businessman who is chairman of the Human Rights Campaign’s board of directors, asked her a question.
  • He said: “Let’s say you’re on the campaign trail and a supporter approaches you and says, ‘Senator, I am old-fashioned and my faith teaches me that marriage is between one man and one woman,’ what is your response?”
  • “Well, I’m going to assume it’s a guy who said that. And I’m going to say then just marry one woman, I’m cool with that – assuming you can find one,” Warren said to loud cheers and applause from the crowd.
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Sen. Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts brought down the house at Thursday night’s series of CNN town halls on LGBTQ rights with her pithy answer to a question on what she would say to someone who didn’t support same-sex marriage.

In all, nine presidential candidates participated in back-to-back mini town halls hosted in partnership with the Human Rights Campaign in Los Angeles, answering questions on how they would protect and expand LGBTQ rights in America.

The town-hall event spanned several hours, but Warren had the line of the night when Morgan Cox, a Texas businessman who is chairman of the Human Rights Campaign’s board of directors, asked her a question.

He said: “Let’s say you’re on the campaign trail and a supporter approaches you and says, ‘Senator, I am old-fashioned and my faith teaches me that marriage is between one man and one woman,’ what is your response?”

“Well, I’m going to assume it’s a guy who said that. And I’m going to say then just marry one woman, I’m cool with that – assuming you can find one,” Warren said to loud cheers and applause from the crowd.


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Warren also addressed federal civil-rights protections for LGBTQ Americans, the access and affordability of HIV and AIDS drugs, and her personal and political history on the subject.

Warren said she regretted criticising a 2012 judicial ruling that allowed an incarcerated transgender person to receive state-funded transition surgery.

“Yeah, it was a bad answer,” Warren said. “And I believe that everyone is entitled to medical care and medical care that they need and that includes people who are transgender.”

When the CNN anchor Chris Cuomo asked whether there was ever a time when Warren, who grew up in Oklahoma and identified as a Republican for many years, didn’t support same-sex marriage, Warren said there wasn’t.

“To me it’s about what I learned in the church I grew up in … it truly is about the preciousness of each and every life,” Warren said. “And the hatefulness frankly always really shocked me, especially for people of faith, because I think the whole foundation is the worth of every single human being.”

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