Apple is giving residents of these 8 states the ability to add their driver’s license or state ID to iPhones and Apple Watches for TSA airport security checks

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  • Apple will let some people add a driver’s license or state ID to Wallet on iPhones or Apple Watches.
  • The company is currently working with eight states to roll out the feature to their residents.
  • Residents can then get through some TSA airport security checkpoints using their phone or watch.
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Apple is working on a new feature that would let you get through airport security with your phone.

The company on Wednesday announced the first eight states where residents will be able to add their driver’s license or state ID to Wallet on their iPhone or Apple Watch.

Arizona and Georgia will kick off the rollout, followed by Connecticut, Iowa, Kentucky, Maryland, Oklahoma, and Utah.

“The addition of driver’s licenses and state IDs to Apple Wallet is an important step in our vision of replacing the physical wallet with a secure and easy-to-use mobile wallet,” said Jennifer Bailey, Apple’s vice president of Apple Pay and Apple Wallet, in the release.

The Transportation Security Administration will let people use the feature to get through security checkpoints and lanes in certain airports, according to the press release.

“This initiative marks a major milestone by TSA to provide an additional level of convenience for the traveler by enabling more opportunities for touchless TSA airport security screening,” TSA Administrator David Pekoske said in the release.

Apple says the selected airports will be the first locations in the rollout where customers can use identification stored in Wallet.

“We are excited that the TSA and so many states are already on board to help bring this to life for travelers across the country using only their iPhone and Apple Watch, and we are already in discussions with many more states as we’re working to offer this nationwide in the future,” Bailey continued in the release.

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Once the feature is available, users can add identification by tapping the + button in Wallet, scanning their driver’s license or state ID card with their iPhone, and taking a selfie. Apple says the selfie is for verification purposes with the issuing state. Users will get a prompt asking them to make several face and head movements “as an additional security step.” Once the issuing state gives verification, the driver’s license or state ID will be added to Wallet. If the user’s iPhone is paired with an Apple Watch, they’ll be prompted to add the identification to Wallet on their watch as well.

From there, users can present identification to the TSA by tapping their iPhone or Apple Watch at the identity reader. Apple says users need to submit Face ID or Touch ID on their devices to share their identification as a security measure so that “only the person who added the driver’s license or state ID to the device can present it.” Users won’t need to show or hand over their device in the process.

As far and privacy and security are concerned, Apple and the issuing states won’t know when or where users present identification, according to the release. The company also says identification will be shared through encrypted communication directly between the iPhone or Apple Watch and the identity reader. If a person loses either device, they can remotely erase it.

The TSA and participating states will make announcements at a later date regarding when the feature will roll out and which TSA checkpoints and lanes will accept it.

Apple’s announcement comes a day after Nikkei Asia reported that production of the upcoming Apple Watch has been delayed partly because of its complex design. Besides identification, Apple hopes to add features like blood pressure measurement, a thermometer for fertility planning, and sleep apnea detection to the Apple Watch in the future, according to the Wall Street Journal.