Bar worker’s final pay check was thousands of 5 cent coins in a bucket, say reports

Three buckets of gold coins
Three buckets of gold coins iStock/Getty Images
  • Rian Keogh had to chase his final pay cheque after quitting his hospitality job.
  • When he finally got his money of €355 ($US416 ($AU573)) – it was a bucket full of 5 cent ($0.07) coins.
  • ‘I thought I legally had to take it, but found out I … actually didn’t. If I had known that, I would have put up a fight,’ he said.
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Leaving a job, especially in a time of a labor shortage, can cause tensions between yourself and your former employer.

Rian Keogh from South Dublin, Ireland, was chasing his final paycheque from his bar job. He had been employed by Alfies, a bar and restaurant in the Irish capital, for two months when he decided to quit.

When he finally got paid – it was in a bucket full of coins.

Whilst the Irish student said he initially laughed when he saw the payment method, it was less amusing when he had to carry the bucket of 7,100 coins, weighing 66 pounds (30kg), when took the bus home.

Speaking to Extra.ie, Keogh said that he had waited two weeks for his pay, and tried to be amenable by agreeing to accept the outstanding pay of €355 ($US416 ($AU573)) as cash in hand.

A bucket of coins isn’t exactly what he meant.

The boss made a manager give the unorthodox payment and she was “really embarrassed,” Keogh told Extra.ie.

‘I thought I legally had to take it but found out through Twitter that I actually didn’t. If I had known that, I would have put up a fight,’ he explained.

Irish law states – according to the Economic and Monetary Union Act of 1998 – that one person does not have to accept more than 50 coins in one transaction.

Alfie’s owner Niall McMahon told the thejournal.ie it was a “personal matter” and would rather not comment on the coin payment.

“It’s between me and that employee and that’s it,” he reportedly said.