838 Aussies drop their smartphone in the loo every day

Picture: Getty Images
  • 21% of Australians have dropped their phone on their own face in bed over the last five years.
  • 838 will drop it in the loo today.
  • Poor smartphone use can be as dangerous as it is costly.

Dropped your smartphone in the loo today? Sadly, you’re not alone.

Far from in, in fact. Even Canadian figure skater Meagan Duhamel lost hers in a non-flush toilet just before her final.

But she still won bronze, and now research from finder.com.au claims 838 Aussies will also drop their smartphone in the toilet every day.

That is as embarrassing as it is deserved. But it’s not the biggest embarrassing finding of the survey.

Of the 2306 people they surveyed, 21% admitted they had dropped their phone on their own face in the past five years while in bed. That equates to 2199 people suffering from phoneface every evening in Australia.

“Whether we admit it or not, we’re on our smartphones a lot of the time, and we take them everywhere from the bedroom, to the beach and even the bathroom, so the chance of a mishap is quite likely,” finder tech expert Alex Kidman said.

But there was a serious side to phone fails.

“Not only can you damage your phone, you can cause yourself and others harm,” Kidman said.

“All too often we see people crossing the road glued to their phones, or even worse, texting while driving.”

Two per cent admit they had been fined for driving while on their hpone, and another 2% said they had almost been hit while looking at their phone.

“When we’re talking about life and death, you know it’s time to make a change,” Kidman said.

Here are finder.com.au’s top phone fails:

Image: finder.com.au

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