Donald Trump Jr. uses YouTube shooting to defend NRA, bash media, liberals

Alex Wong/Getty ImagesDonald Trump Jr.
  • President Donald Trump’s eldest son, Donald Trump Jr., responded to Tuesday’s shooting at YouTube’s headquarters in California by defending the National Rifle Association and attacking the media.
  • The NRA has increasingly been a target of gun-control advocates in the wake of the deadly school shooting in Parkland, Florida, in February and the March for Our Lives rally last month.
  • The president has also questioned the role of the NRA in politics and seemed to call for some stricter gun regulations.
  • He has also floated a ban on bump stocks, accessories designed to increase the rate of fire of semiautomatic rifles.

President Donald Trump’s eldest son, Donald Trump Jr., responded to Tuesday’s shooting at YouTube’s headquarters in California by defending the National Rifle Association and attacking the media.

Authorities have identified Nasim Aghdam, 39, as the shooter who injured three people at the headquarters and then killed herself.

The shooting came amid a wide reckoning on gun violence in the US, which Trump Jr. quickly commented on.

Social media accounts linked to Aghdam included messages about animal rights and veganism. After some of those accounts were taken down, Trump Jr. speculated on how things might have been different if the shooter were a member of the NRA.

“You think there’s any chance whatsoever that a mass shooters hateful Instagram and YouTube channels would be pulled immediately if they were NRA members as opposed to liberal Vegan PETA activists? Asking for a few million friends in the @NRA,”Trump Jr. tweeted.

Responding to a tweet suggesting that pundits would try to blame the YouTube shooting on “right-wing gun nuts,” Trump Jr. said: “They will find a way. Just wait.”

He continued: “I look forward to the whole PETA has more mass shooters than the NRA conversations. I’m sure they will cover that… right?”

A review by Business Insider of news coverage of recent mass shootings in the US could find no instance in which a shooter or suspect was found to have been a member of the NRA.

The NRA does not publish its membership numbers but has said at various times that it has 5 million members. The organisation takes in about $US360 million a year in membership dues and other income, according to its IRS filings.

In the wake of the mass shooting at a high school in Parkland, Florida, in February, the NRA, which also works as a powerful gun lobby in Washington, has increasingly been a target of gun-control advocates, including students who survived that shooting and spearheaded the March for Our Lives rally last month.

Some of those students who have appeared on national news outlets like CNN have likened support for the NRA to support for killing kids. One described US politicians as the “b—- of the NRA” in a promotional video for the rally.

The president has also questioned the role of the NRA in politics and seemed to push for some stricter gun regulations, including a ban on bump stocks, accessories designed to increase the rate of fire of semiautomatic rifles.

More on the YouTube shooting:

NOW WATCH: Briefing videos

Business Insider Emails & Alerts

Site highlights each day to your inbox.

Follow Business Insider Australia on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, and Instagram.