Does America Need Manufacturing? What Does Mr. Arithmetic Tell Us?

Boeing Factory

Photo: Boeing

The NYT devoted a major Sunday magazine piece to this question.It never raised the most fundamental question, if we buy all our manufactured goods from someone else, how are we going to pay for them?

Our goods deficit is currently running at annual rate of around $800 billion or 5.3 per cent of GDP.

We have a surplus on services of around $170 billion a year, less than 1.2 per cent of GDP.

If we lost all our manufacturing, then the deficit on goods would increase by about $1.2 trillion to more than 13 per cent of GDP.

What services do we think that we will export to make up this gap? We are rapidly losing ground in many areas. For example in software and computer services we are already a big net importer from India.

It is hard to see how this gets reversed any time soon. We do earn a lot of patent licensing fees, but these fees will always be vulnerable to a tide of free trade sentiment. Besides, it is very hard to imagine them rising beyond a couple of per cent of GDP as a maximum.

One of our biggest surplus areas is tourism. This raises the prospect that the anti-manufacturing crowd thinks that we are too sophisticated to work in factories, but not to clean toilets and make beds. There is nothing wrong with latter (I have done it as a summer job), but it’s not what most folks would consider upscale employment.

The bottom line is that unless we think someone is going to hand us trillions of dollars worth of manufactured goods for nothing indefinitely, then there is zero doubt that America needs manufacturing. It also needs people writing on economic issues who know arithmetic.

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