3 more telcos are compensating another 5000 customers over NBN speeds they paid for but couldn't get

Dodo/ Facebook.Slow as a…

The Australian Consumer and Comptetition Comission’s ongoing crusade against misleading NBN speeds has claimed another three scalps, with a trio of ISPs owned by Vocus – Dodo, iPrimus and Commander – agreeing to compensate more than 5000 customers over internet speeds they couldn’t get on the NBN contracts they paid for.

The latest announcement they the trio will offer refunds and move to lower speed contracts or let people cancel their contracts with a refund and no penalty, follows on from similar deals between ISPs and the ACCC, including 11,000 customers with TPG-owned iiNet and Internode earlier this week.

The latest announcement brings the total number of customers compensated for being misled over the NBN speed they bought to more than 76,000, by eight different internet providers, with TPG, Telstra and Optus also being called to account by the consumer watchdog.

The latest announcement involves 3,384 customers from Dodo, 1,912 from iPrimus and 565 from Commander for services provided between October 2015 and 30 June 2017.

ACCC Commissioner Sarah Court said the three companies admitted to offering speed plans they couldn’t deliver.

“They likely breached consumer law by engaging in misleading or deceptive conduct and making false or misleading representations,” she said.

The ISPs will contact affected customers by email or letter over the next month outlining their compensation options.

“Affected customers may prefer to exit their contract with a refund rather than accept a service that does not meet their needs. Dodo, iPrimus and Commander will also be required to tell new customers if they are not getting the maximum speeds advertised to them,” Court said.

NOW WATCH: Tech Insider videos

Want to read a more in-depth view on the trends influencing Australian business and the global economy? BI / Research is designed to help executives and industry leaders understand the major challenges and opportunities for industry, technology, strategy and the economy in the future. Sign up for free at research.businessinsider.com.au.

Tagged In