Diary Of An Australian Google Glass User: Day 5

After nearly a week of showing what wearing Google Glass is like in a variety of everyday situations, we now have one more test: the airport.

Nearly every week I fly to Sydney for work and these day trips are a non-stop sprint of meetings, presentations and catch-ups.

Leaving at 6:45am and returning after 7pm, there is little time for rest and no time for error, which is why it is wonderful having a personal assistant in Google Glass always there to keep me on track.

When I arrived at the airport, I received a notification on Glass reminding me of the flight number, gate number, check-in time and a status update showing if the flight was on time. The app doing this is TripIt, a brilliant service that stores and organises all my travel details so it can provide me timely reminders whenever I need them.

It does this extraordinarily well, so much so that a few weeks ago while I was sitting in the Virgin Australia lounge I received a notification telling me the flight had been delayed by 20 minutes so I didn’t have to rush to the gate, five minutes before it was even announced over the airport speakers. Little things like this really add up to make travelling that much more enjoyable.

Going through security is always unpleasant, whether you are wearing Google Glass or not. Surprisingly, the security agents didn’t make any comments about it as normally they always ask me what I am wearing and if it has x-ray vision.

I’ve noticed that since I switched from the original Glass design to the new Glass frames that look more like regular glasses people don’t comment as often. In fact, people used to stop me multiple times a day to talk about Google Glass and now it hardly ever happens at all. This is a really positive indication that as Glass becomes more integrated into the frames it will become less of a statement to wear them. For obvious reasons I didn’t take any photos while going through security or on the airplane, even though they would have been some great pictures.

As I walked to my gate, I quickly checked in on Foursquare, the location based social network and recommendation guide. While Foursquare itself is available on a variety of mobile devices, the ability to check in with just a voice command is unique to Glass and serves as an exciting test case of how social networks will work with wearable technology. It really makes engaging with these services far easier and less obtrusive, requiring no more effort than saying few words out loud.

Later in the day when I met with an associate for coffee to discuss the incredible potential for Glass in the health care industry, we decided we wanted to grab lunch. Using Foursquare I was able to see which restaurants were nearby and how they had been rated, highlighting reviews submitted by my friends. It makes finding restaurants while travelling much easier.

Overall wearing Google Glass is a fascinating, occasionally frustrating and definitely worthwhile experience. It is still a very new technology that carries with it the benefits and challenges that all innovative devices have to deal with. As the technology improves and developers find more usages for it, we will see Glass become a facilitator of meaningful changes in everything from how we conduct business to the way we engage in the world around us. Google Glass is just one part of a much larger journey, and we are excited to be helping lead the way.

Day 1 of the Australian Google Glass diary is here.
Day 2 of the Australian Google Glass diary is here.
Day 3 of the Australian Google Glass diary is here.
Day 4 of the Australian Google Glass diary is here.

Josh Guest is the founder of mobile app development company b2cloud. Founded in 2009 with his business partner Luke Smorgon, the company has grown from partnering with small start-ups looking for an affordable mobile app to working with some of Australia’s largest corporates like Telstra, BUPA and Virgin Mobile. b2cloud is one of the few Australian development companies to own and develop apps for Google Glass.

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