Denton: "The Dream Of Micropublishing Is Dead!"

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Gawker Media owner Nick Denton wanted to sell his Los Angeles-based entertainment blog Defamer, but he apparently found no takers. Instead, the site will fold into Gawker proper. In December 2008, Denton did the same thing with Silicon Valley gossip blog, Valleywag.

The theory is that it’s easier to get agency brand managers to spend their clients’ money on one very popular Web destination than it is to convince them to spend the same amount on lots of niche sites.

For this same reason Gawker.com’s “skyline” — the posts above the navigation bar — will now feature posts from blogs Jezebel, Defamer and Valleywag.

“Scale matters — both for marketing to readers and advertisers,” says Nick. “The dream of micropublishing is dead!”

Our recent relaunch as “the Business Insider” seems to reflect this industry perception too.

Here’s how Defamer broke the news:

Like a waffling yard sale lady who, push come to shove, simply couldn’t part with her prized collection of People “Sexiest Man Alives,” Nick Denton has succumbed to a crippling case of seller’s remorse.

As a result, Defamer is being absorbed into the company’s power-crazed flagship title. Defamer posts will now appear under http://defamer.com/, while simultaneously feeding into the Gawker homepage.

Gawker’s managing editor Gabriel Snyder, a former West Coaster who covered Hollywood for Variety and W, will oversee the transition. As for your trusty Defamer team, we’ve opted to explore new horizons. Stv, Kyle, the McCluskey Twins, and myself will be here through the remainder of the week. Watch this space for exciting announcements on what’s to come.

(Disclosure: Nicholas Carlson used to write for Valleywag, a folded Gawker Media blog)

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