IT'S OVER: THE US GOVERNMENT SHUTDOWN IS ENDING, AND A FISCAL CRISIS HAS BEEN AVERTED

The budget battles of the fall of 2013 have come to an end.

The House of Representatives voted late Wednesday night to pass the Senate’s bill that reopens the government and raises the nation’s $16.7 trillion borrowing limit, putting an end to a 16-day federal government shutdown and ending the threat of a potential default on U.S. obligations.

The final margin was 285-144. 87 Republicans joined 198 Democrats in voting for the bill in the House. All 144 “no” votes were from Republicans.

Earlier, the Senate passed the bill by an overwhelming 81-18 margin. The bill now heads to the desk of President Barack Obama, who has said he will sign it “immediately.”

The bill was the result of a deal brokered by Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid and Minority Leader Mitch McConnell earlier Wednesday. It funds the government through Jan. 1 and suspends the nation’s debt limit through Feb. 7.

It also includes a measure of income verification for those receiving subsidies under the Affordable Care Act. In short, the Secretary of Human Health Services will submit a report no later than Jan. 1 detailing the verification process. The department’s inspector general will submit to Congress no later than July a report on the effectiveness of those procedures.

House Speaker John Boehner let the bill come to the House floor and pass with mostly Democratic votes.

Obama delivered a statement from the White House Wednesday night after the Senate completed its vote, hailing leaders from both parties for reaching the agreement.

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