Brexit Secretary David Davis: There is no time to give MPs a meaningful vote on leaving the EU

David DavisGareth Fuller / PA Wire/Press Association ImagesDavid Davis, secretary of state for exiting the European Union

LONDON — There is not enough time to give MPs a meaningful vote on the government’s final Brexit deal with the EU, according to David Davis.

On Saturday, Davis — secretary of state for exiting the European Union — instructed Conservative MPs to remove House of Lords amendments from the Article 50 bill, one of which would give the government a meaningful vote on whether to accept or veto the government’s final Brexit deal.

On Sunday, Davis said that MPs will have a vote, but it would simply be on whether to accept the government’s deal in full or walk away with no deal at all — which is widely-regarded as the worst possible outcome.

He told the BBC’s Andrew Marr show on Sunday morning: “There is a limited time on this. We didn’t choose the timetable, it’s a two-year time limit on Article 50. So there’ll be a limit to what you can do.”

He added: “Secondly, what we can’t have is either House of Parliament reversing the decision for the British people. They haven’t got a veto — what does it mean otherwise?

“I’m sure there’ll be votes throughout this process — there’ll be a vote on the deal we strike, it will be a meaningful vote in the sense that they accept it or not.”

The European Union (Notification of Withdrawal) Bill could pass its final stages on Monday if the House of Lords accepts the decisions made by MPs when they vote on it earlier in the day.

If the bill is passed on Monday, May could trigger Article 50 as soon as Tuesday, according to the Guardian.

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