Forget That $75 Million Liability Cap: Criminal Charges IN BP Spill Are "Very Likely" Says Former DOJ Official

bp transocean trial

As Deepwater investigations turn up evidence of negligence — including a blowout preventer that was out of batteries and hadn’t been properly tested — it’s becoming obvious that someone will face criminal charges.

McClatchy quotes the former head of environmental crimes at the Justice Department, David M. Uhlmann: “There is no question there’ll be an enforcement action, and it’s very likely that there will be at least some criminal charges brought.”

Criminal charges would put an axe through a $75 million cap on civil charges for oil pollution. The cap was already looking flimsy as Obama asked Congress to set a higher limit.

Prosecutors in criminal cases can seek twice the cost of environmental and economic damages resulting from the spill, according to McClatchy.

So what’s the damage?

Here’s What You Need To Know About The $2.2 Trillion Gulf Economy >>

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