A majority of US companies say they’re planning to require employees to get vaccinated by the end of the year

COVID 19 vaccine
Apple, Goldman Sachs, and Uber are requiring some or all employees get a COVID-19 vaccine. Dado Ruvic/Reuters
  • Half of US companies are planning to require workers get a COVID-19 vaccine by the end of 2021.
  • Willis Towers Watson polled 961 US companies that employ a total of around 9.7 million people.
  • Apple, Goldman Sachs, and Uber are requiring some or all employees get a COVID-19 vaccine.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

More than half of US companies plan to require some or all of their employees to get vaccinated against COVID-19 by the end of the year, according to a survey first reported by Reuters.

The survey, which polled 961 US companies that employ a total of around 9.7 million people, found that 52% of employers plan to have one or more vaccine mandate requirements.

Among the companies requiring some kind of a vaccine mandate are Google’s parent Alphabet and Goldman Sachs Group.

Willis Towers Watson, which conducted the survey, polled employers between August 18 and 25, Reuters reported.

Many major corporations have announced employee requirements around the COVID-19 vaccine. Delta has announced employees that don’t get vaccinated will need to pay $US200 ($AU273) more a month for health insurance, and Uber has required corporate workers get a jab before returning to the office.

The Reuters survey mirrors a Gallup poll that found more than half of US workers want their employer to require a COVID vaccine.

Some smaller businesses, like the Massachusetts-based home healthcare agency Best of Care, have not required COVID vaccines due to fears it could exacerbate the labor shortage. Though job openings are on the rise, many industries cannot find enough workers due in part to to low wages and lack of job flexibility.

More than 72% of eligible Americans have received at least one dose of the COVID-19 vaccine so far, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Cases of COVID-19 rose sharply in July due to the rise of the Delta variant, which is more transmissible than the original strain.