This is the one stat that has every Wall Street banker depressed

Mergers and acquisitions, or M&A, deals have been falling apart lately — and it’s starting to seriously hurt Wall Street.

Wall Street banks have lost $1.2 billion in revenues because of withdrawn global M&A so far this year, according to Dealogic.

That’s up 33% from last year — and its highest level since 2007.

Lost revenues from megadeals, or deals worth $10 billion or more, make up 65% of the total withdrawn M&A revenues this year. In 2007, megadeals only made up 58% of withdrawn M&A, according to Dealogic.

Of the total $1.2 billion in lost revenues, $736 million came from abandoned deals in the US, and $280 million came from withdrawn healthcare deals, specifically.

The total value of withdrawn M&A deals so far this year is $481 billion, according to Dealogic.

The largest transaction to fall apart in 2016 is the Pfizer-Allergan merger, a deal that would have been worth $160 billion. It was scrapped last month
after the US Treasury announced new rules clamping down on so-called tax inversions.

That cost advisers more than $200 million in revenues, according to the consultant Freeman & Co.

Then there was Honeywell’s $103 billion bid for United Technologies, which it abandoned in March, and Canadian Pacific Railway’s $40.7 billion bid for Norfolk Southern, which collapsed in April.

Halliburton and Baker Hughes on Sunday called off their $28 billion megadeal after facing opposition from antitrust regulators in the US and Europe.
That lost Wall Street banks more than $100 million in advisory and financing fees, according to Freeman.

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