A popular dating app sent users an unfortunate message over the weekend that mixed up gay pride and America

“It’s fag day!”

Users of the dating app “Coffee Meets Bagel” were surprised when that notification popped up on their status bars the same weekend so many cities around the country were celebrating gay pride.

The app meant to message its users with: “It’s flag day.”

The notification went out to all “Coffee Meets Bagel” members on the East coast at the same time Brooklyn, Boston, and Washington DC were celebrating gay pride this past weekend, The Washington Post reports.

Manhattan holds its gay pride parade at the end of June.

“Coffee Meets Bagel” bills itself as “the only dating app that women love” on its website.

It sends each user a match at 12pm each day (the match is referred to as a “bagel”) and you can either pass on your bagel or accept the match. 

The app’s founder Arum Kang said it was the first time they had to correct a mistake, saying they caught the error 10-15 minutes after it was sent to users and corrected the future blasts to other time zones.

The Washington Post’s Lisa Bonos reports:

About three hours after the notification went out, users received an email from the company’s head of customer experience apologizing for the misspelling. It reads, in part:

“I would like to apologise wholeheartedly for the message you received this afternoon. The misspelling of Flag Day was a mistake and a complete oversight. We’re updating our process to ensure something like this does not happen again.

“Coffee Meets Bagel, as a company and as individual employees, celebrates the LGBTQ community and would never use such a word.”

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