Biden nominates Cindy McCain for ambassadorship with the UN food agency

Cindy McCain attends the Ambrosetti International Economic Forum 2019 'Lo scenario dell'Economia e della Finanza' on September 7, 2019 in Cernobbio, Italy.
Cindy McCain. Pier Marco Tacca/Getty Images
  • President Biden has tapped Cindy McCain for a post at the United Nations.
  • Cindy McCain will represent the US at the UN’s food agency if she’s confirmed by the Senate.
  • She endorsed Biden during the 2020 campaign and is the widow of the late Sen. John McCain.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Cindy McCain, an Arizona businesswoman and the widow of the late Republican Sen. John McCain, has picked to take over as the US representative for the United Nations Agencies for Food and Agriculture.

The White House announced the nomination on Wednesday, with President Joe Biden making her one of the few Republicans set to enter the administration. Her nomination will require Senate confirmation, similar to other ambassadors.

McCain took heat from former President Donald Trump during the campaign for endorsing Biden, and even got censured by the Arizona GOP, which she called a “badge of honor.”

The 67-year-old earned a bachelor’s degree from the University of Southern California and started her career as a special education teacher before meeting her future husband, then a US Navy liaison officer to the Senate after coming home from Vietnam, where he was a prisoner of war.

Although the McCains were pitted against Biden and former President Barack Obama in the 2008 presidential campaign, both she and President Biden have described themselves as friends.

“I am deeply honored and look forward the work ahead,” McCain tweeted Wednesday.

She also shared congratulatory messages she received, including from Democratic Sen. Krysten Sinema of Arizona.

-Cindy McCain (@cindymccain) June 23, 2021

The UN food agency has a mission to address global hunger and spur efforts to make agriculture more sustainable.

It also coordinates with governments following disasters to shore up their food supplies.

Biden also announced a slew of other ambassadorship picks on Wednesday, which had been delayed during the early months of the administration as they prioritized public health-related posts.