Wife Of Jefferies Banker Reportedly Apologizes For 'Inaccurate, Untrue' Things Written About The Couple's Divorce

Christina Kelly — the estranged wife of Jefferies healthcare banker Sage Kelly — has issued an apology to the investment bank, Bloomberg News reports citing a new custody agreement.

“A substantial portion of what has been written in the press and other media over the past few weeks is inaccurate, untrue or hyperbolic, and I apologise to those who have been affected thereby — including those at Jefferies and those associated with Jefferies,” Christina Kelly said in the tentative custody agreement.

According to Bloomberg, Christina didn’t specifically point out what was inaccurate or untrue. Her attorney also declined to comment on whether she would walk back her accusations made in her affidavit, the Bloomberg report said.

Last month, in a 26-page sworn affidavit as part of a divorce proceeding and custody battle seeking $US7 million in damages, Christina Kelly, who has two daughters with Sage, made accusations that her husband and a number of Jefferies bankers and clients had abused cocaine.

All of the Jefferies bankers and clients named in the affidavit categorically denied her allegations.

Christina Kelly also made allegations that Sage Kelly had used other illicit substances such as ecstasy, molly, mushrooms and ketamine. She also accused him of extramarital sex, including an alleged partner swap with a client and his girlfriend.

Shortly after the allegations were circulated in the media, Sage Kelly took a leave of absence from Jefferies to deal with the private matter.

The firm’s CEO Richard Handler later issued a public memo showing his support for Sage Kelly and the Jefferies team. He also said that they all volunteered to take a drug test and everyone passed.

According to Bloomberg, Christina Kelly said they have reached an amicable settlement.

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