China responds to the US's and Canada's travel warnings with its own, the latest move in an escalating feud

Feng Li / Getty
  • The Chinese foreign ministry issued a travel advisory for Canada, warning Chinese citizens to “fully evaluate risks” before travelling there.
  • The advisory cited an “arbitrary detention” at the request of a “third-party country.”
  • The move appears to be the latest in an escalating feud that began with the arrest of the Huawei executive Meng Wanzhou in Canada in early December at the request of the US, which has accused her of violating sanctions.

China issued a travel advisory on Tuesday for Canada, urging Chinese citizens to exercise caution and “fully evaluate risks” and citing an “arbitrary detention” at the request of a “third-party country,” Reuters reported.

The move appears to be the latest in an escalating situation over the December arrest of the Huawei executive Meng Wanzhou, who was detained in Canada at the request of the United States on charges that she violated sanctions.

Meng has been released on bail faces extradition to the US.


Read more:
Canada arrested Huawei’s CFO, and the US is seeking to extradite her

In an apparent response to the arrest, China began detaining Canadian nationals in China. Amid the fallout, the US Department of State issued a travel advisory for China, warning that US citizens who travel to China may not be able to return home.

“Exercise increased caution in China due to arbitrary enforcement of local laws,” the US’s advisory says, adding: “Chinese authorities have asserted broad authority to prohibit U.S. citizens from leaving China by using ‘exit bans,’ sometimes keeping U.S. citizens in China for years. China uses exit bans coercively.”

The advisory says US citizens may not have access to consular services and could be subjected to prolonged interrogations and held in extended detention.


Read more:
The US government is warning Americans that if they visit China they may not be able to return home

China on Monday retried the drug-smuggling case of Robert Lloyd Schellenberg, a Canadian national who was arrested in 2014 and sentenced in November to 15 years in prison. The court decided that was too lenient and instead sentenced him to death.


Read more:
China sentenced a Canadian man to death in the latest escalation of the countries’ feud over Huawei

“It is of extreme concern to us as a government, as it should be to all our international friends and allies, that China has chosen to arbitrarily apply the death penalty,” Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said on Monday in response to Schellenberg’s sentence.

Canada also issued a travel advisory for China, telling citizens to “exercise a high degree of caution in China due to the risk of arbitrary enforcement of local laws.”


Read more:
Canada joins US in raising travel advisory after China’s ‘arbitrary’ use of law to sentence Canadian to death in drug case

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