CHARTS OF THE WEEK: Is College Education The Next Bubble Set To Burst?

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  • Is College Education The Next Bubble Set To Burst?
  • Nevada Is The New King Of Unemployment
  • Here’s Why Ben Bernanke Thinks He Can Get Away With Massive Amounts Of Additional Stimulus
  • How An End To Europe’s Crisis Will Hammer U.S. Bondholders
  • Here’s The Wussy Double Dip Scenario Used In The EU Stress Tests

Is College Education The Next Bubble Set To Burst?

The price of a college education, compared to the CPI, has risen dramatically since 1980. It has outpaced the housing bubble, and has many of the same characteristics, including a government sponsored credit bubble.

And with competitive quality now in question compared to emerging economies like China, the value per dollar spent for that American college tuition may be even lower.

From Carpe Diem (via Humble Student of the Markets)

Nevada Is The New King Of Unemployment

This chart, from Calculated Risk, points to what are some shocking realities for states breaking unemployment records and a reshaping of the worst hit parts of the country.

Now Nevada is number 1 for unemployment, rather than Michigan, which held the title for four years until May 2010.

Rhode Island, Georgia, and Connecticut are notably close to their records.

Here's Why Ben Bernanke Thinks He Can Get Away With Massive Amounts Of Additional Stimulus

Despite expanding economic activity across the U.S., inflation expectations continue to drop. Month by month, expected inflation has dropped, not just for the near-term, but even for as far as 10-years out. This is shown by the chart below which was built by Macro Musings using Cleveland Fed data.

Usually the greatest check on a central bank's ability to stimulate the economy is the threat of inflation. Yet this threat is at least perceived to be falling, even from the already puny levels of April. It's charts like this that make Ben Bernanke feel disinflation (low, falling inflation) or deflation (falling prices) are a far greater threat than inflation. Which means the U.S. federal reserve probably doesn't feel like its stimulus decisions are restricted by inflationary risks at all right now.

How An End To Europe's Crisis Will Hammer U.S. Bondholders

Here's The Wussy Double Dip Scenario Used In The EU Stress Tests

Here's the adverse economic scenario against-which European banks have been tested, according to the just-released CEBS report.

As you can see, the expected double dip scenarios show a decline of less than 1%.

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