Join

Enter Details

Comment on stories, receive email newsletters & alerts.

@
This is your permanent identity for Business Insider Australia
Your email must be valid for account activation
Minimum of 8 standard keyboard characters

Subscribe

Email newsletters but will contain a brief summary of our top stories and news alerts.

Forgotten Password

Enter Details


Back to log in

English wine maker Chapel Wine says production is up 10% and that 2017 produced 'excellent quality fruit'

Bottles at Chapel Down vineyardGeographBottles at Chapel Down vineyard

LONDON — English wine producer Chapel Down has announced their second highest yield of fruit to date at the completion of their 2017 harvest.

The winery said 2017 yielded “excellent quality fruit” and the second most yet by volume, up 10% from last year.

The news comes despite a difficult start to the growing season, after a number of vineyard sites were hit by frost in late April.

Chapel Down said it had been able to minimise this risk by sourcing from 23 vineyards across the south east of England, from Dorset to Kent.

“Following a challenging start to the season, we enjoyed an excellent flowering season in June and a decent English summer in our vineyards,” said CEO Frazer Thompson in a statement.

“With an early harvest in good weather we were able to record our second highest ever harvest by volume — some 10% greater than last year,” he said.

The news comes despite a warning from the International Organisation of Vine and Wine in October that global wine production this year is expected to fall to its lowest level since 1961, due to “extreme weather” conditions.

Thompson said Chapel Down had seen some “truly exceptional parcels of Chardonnay,” and that demand for their wine continued to grow.

NOW WATCH: Money & Markets videos

Want to read a more in-depth view on the trends influencing Australian business and the global economy? BI / Research is designed to help executives and industry leaders understand the major challenges and opportunities for industry, technology, strategy and the economy in the future. Sign up for free at research.businessinsider.com.au.