Chance the Rapper distances himself from Kanye West's vocal support of Trump after the president thanked both rappers in a tweet

  • Chance the Rapper distanced himself from Kanye West’s vocal support of President Donald Trump in a tweet on Friday, after Trump thanked both rappers on Twitter earlier in the day.
  • Chance, whose real name is Chancellor Bennett, drew criticism from left-leaning fans and support from the right on Wednesday for tweeting, “Black people don’t have to be democrats,” in response to West’s support of Trump.
  • On Friday, Bennett posted screenshots of an extended iPhone note explaining the rationale behind his tweets.

Chance the Rapper distanced himself from Kanye West’s vocal support of President Donald Trump in a tweet on Friday, after Trump thanked both rappers on Twitter earlier in the day.

Chance, whose real name is Chancellor Bennett, drew criticism from left-leaning fans and support from the right on Wednesday for tweeting, “Black people don’t have to be democrats.”

Bennett’s tweet came in response to West praising Trump as his “brother” and posting a picture of himself wearing a red “Make America Great Again” hat on Twitter Wednesday. West also criticised former President Barack Obama for not doing enough to “change” Chicago, Illinois, West’s and Bennett’s hometown.

Trump on Friday morning tweeted: “Kanye West has performed a great service to the Black Community – Big things are happening and eyes are being opened for the first time in Decades – Legacy Stuff! Thank you also to Chance and Dr. Darrell Scott, they really get it (lowest Black & Hispanic unemployment in history).”

Following Trump’s tweet on Friday, Bennett posted screenshots of an extended iPhone note explaining the rationale behind his tweets.

“I didn’t speak up because I agree with what Kanye had to say or cause I f— with Trump,” Bennett wrote. “I did it because I wanted to help my friend and cause I felt like I was being used to attack him.”

In reference to Trump, Bennet wrote that he would “never support anyone who has made a career out of hatred, racism and discrimination,” before elaborating on his earlier tweet stating that “Black people don’t have to be democrats.”

“My statement about black folk not having to be democrats (though true) was a deflection from the real conversation and stemmed from a personal issue with the fact that Chicago has had generations of democratic officials with no investment or regard for black schools, neighbourhood or black lives. But again, said that s— at the wrong time,” he wrote.

Read his full statement below:

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