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Here’s NASA’s plan to retrieve the first ever samples from Mars

NASA has unveiled its plan for its next Mars rover, “Mars 2020,” which will collect samples from the surface of the Red Planet. Following is a transcript of the video. Since landing Viking 1 on Mars in 1975, NASA has successfully put 7 rovers on Mars. But there’s still one […]
Here’s NASA’s plan to retrieve the first ever samples from Mars
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Curiosity’s Wheels Look Like They Are Falling Apart

The Curiosity rover has only driven about three miles after more than a year on Mars, but her thin aluminium wheels already appear to be feeling the pain. After completing a software upgrade on the one-ton robot last week, officials at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory announced that the next task […]
Curiosity’s Wheels Look Like They Are Falling Apart
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Something Went Wrong On The Curiosity Rover

[credit provider=” NASA/JPL-Caltech”] This story was published on March 1, 2013.A computer glitch on NASA’s Mars rover Curiosity has forced the robot to switch to a backup computer while engineers try to resolve the problem.
Something Went Wrong On The Curiosity Rover
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Curiosity Grabs Mars Rock Samples For The First Time

[credit provider=”NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS “] NASA’s Curiosity rover has drilled into a Martian rock and collected samples, marking the first time any robot has ever performed this complicated manoeuvre on the surface of another planet.The 1-ton Curiosity rover used its arm-mounted drill to bore a hole 0.63 inches (1.6 centimeters) wide and […]
Curiosity Grabs Mars Rock Samples For The First Time
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Curiosity Made A Tiny Hole On Mars

In a planned test of the drilling system on the Curiosity rover, NASA scientists drilled a 0.8 inch deep hole into a Martian rock named “John Klein.” The hole is 0.63 inches across.
Curiosity Made A Tiny Hole On Mars
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This Drill Bit May Be The Key To Finding Life On Mars

[credit provider=”NASA” url=”http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/msl/multimedia/pia16719.html”] The image above is a head-on view of the tip of the drill bit on NASA’s Mars Curiosity rover. It may look threatening when it’s right in your face, but the bit is actually just .6 inch wide — in other words, it’s no rock-chiseling jackhammer. 
This Drill Bit May Be The Key To Finding Life On Mars