The Guy Who's Suing Yahoo For $2.7 Billion Is Going After It On Twitter

Carlos Bazan-Canabal

Photo: Carlos Bazan-Canabal

Carlos Bazan-Canabal has come out as the guy who sued Yahoo over a failed telephone-directory project in Mexico—and won a preliminary judgment in the case for $2.7 billion.That’s “billion” with a “B.”

Bazan-Canabal, an early employee at Yahoo Mexico, was one of the first Mexican bloggers, and he’s active in social media. After initially being vague about his involvement in the case filed by his company, Worldwide Directories, in 2009, he’s now railing against Yahoo on Twitter.

Yahoo, for its part, has acknowledged the judgment, which it calls “non-final,” in a regulatory filing, declared Bazan-Canabal’s case “without merit,” and said it plans an appeal. The company hasn’t otherwised commented, which is causing concern on Wall Street—since the judgment, 

Here’s what he’s been saying.

Translation: I hope the Mexican judicial system will act in compliance with the law and not permit giants to act arbitrarily.

Translation: At times the big guys, the giants act irresponsibly and destroy small businesses and many families.

Translation: In 2002, I started a successful project. A short time later, the dream went up in smoke. In 2005, I began a legal battle.

Translation: After just one week, as the result of much preparation and much work, this legal battle gave us reason in court. Now to keep fighting.

Translation: Worldwide Directories has hired Paul Gupta of the law firm Orrick, Herrington & Sutcliffe for our defence.

Translation: Today I will meet with lawyers and will shortly convene a press conference. I’ll keep you informed here.

Translation: I want to clarify that Worldwide Directories will exhaust all legal means, in Mexico and other countries, to make justice prevail.

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