Britney Spears was given ‘pre-packaged envelopes’ of her medication by her security detail, an ex-staffer said in a new documentary

Singer Britney Spears arrives at the 2016 MTV Video Music Awards in New York, U.S., August 28, 2016.
Singer Britney Spears arrives at the 2016 MTV Video Music Awards in New York, U.S., August 28, 2016. Eduardo Munoz/Reuters
  • Britney Spears was given “pre-packaged envelopes” of her medicine, a former staffer said.
  • Alex Vlasov, who worked on Spears’ security detail for years, made the allegation in a new doc.
  • “How is it okay that we’re in charge of her medication?” he said in “Controlling Britney Spears.”
  • Visit Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Britney Spears was given “pre-packaged envelopes” of her medication by her security detail, according to the new documentary “The New York Times Presents: Controlling Britney Spears.”

Alex Vlasov, the executive assistant of operations at Black Box Security (which was reportedly used by Spears’ father Jamie for the singer’s security detail), made the shocking allegation.

“How is it okay that we’re in charge of her medication? We’re given pre-packaged envelopes,” Vlasov said in the documentary.

According to Vlasov, he was told by his higher-ups: “This is what security should be doing because this is what the client is asking for, or this is what the client needs… The client is Jamie [Spears].”

“It really reminded me of somebody who was in prison,” Vlasov added. “Every single request was monitored and recorded.

“She’s just like a child, and like any other minor who needs her parents consent,” he said.

Edan Yemini, president of Black Box Security, denied Vlasov’s claims in a statement shown in the documentary. Per Yemini, Black Box employees have “always conducted themselves within the professional, ethical and legal bounds, and they are particularly proud of their work in keeping Ms. Spears safe for many years.”

Representatives for Spears, her father, and Black Box didn’t immediately respond to Insider’s requests for comment.

Jamie Spears, father of singer Britney Spears, leaves the Stanley Mosk Courthouse in Los Angeles on Oct. 24, 2012, left, and Britney Spears arrives at the Billboard Music Awards in Las Vegas on May 17, 2015.
Jamie Spears, father of singer Britney Spears, leaves the Stanley Mosk Courthouse in Los Angeles on Oct. 24, 2012, left, and Britney Spears arrives at the Billboard Music Awards in Las Vegas on May 17, 2015. AP Photo

The new documentary (a follow-up to “Framing Britney Spears,” which sparked conversations about the singer’s wellbeing and legal situation when it premiered earlier this year) is filled with bombshell allegations from Vlasov and other former members of Spears’ team.

Tish Yates, the head of wardrobe for the 2009 “Circus” tour, recalled that Spears once became terrified she’d fail a drug test and be unable to see her children after smelling marijuana smoke during a tour stop.

“She is distressed. She is upset,” Yates recalled in the documentary. “She’s yelling, ‘It smells like pot. It smells like pot. I can’t breathe this. I cannot breathe is. I will fail a drug test. I won’t see my boys.'”

And in a clip that premiered Friday on “Good Morning America,” Vlasov also revealed that the singer was being recorded – and that he was once asked to delete “extremely sensitive” audio footage by other members of Spears’ team.

The staffer said the other team members told him that “nobody can ever know about this” and he needed “to delete everything on it, so there’s no record of it.”

But being asked to wipe the devices “raised so many red flags,” he said in the clip.

“I did not want to be complicit in whatever they were involved in, so I kept a copy, because I don’t want to delete evidence,” Vlasov said.