Human remains identified as Brian Laundrie haven’t been tested for DNA yet, medical examiner says

A Utah police officer's bodycam view of Brian Laundrie in the drivers' seat of a van. Laundrie is looking up at the officer.
Brian Laundrie talking to , Utah, on August 12 2021. Moab City Police Department
  • DNA analysis has not yet been performed on the human remains that have been identified as Brian Laundrie’s.
  • “Samples will be submitted for DNA testing once the examination of the remains” is complete, a medical examiner said.
  • Authorities say that a comparison of dental records confirmed that the human remains were Laundrie’s.

DNA analysis has not yet been performed on the human remains that have been identified as those of Brian Laundrie’s, according to a Florida medical examiner.

Laundrie’s remains were discovered on October 20 near his backpack at the 25,000-acre Carlton Reserve in the Sunshine State where his parents previously told authorities their son went for a hike the month before and never returned to their North Port, Florida home.

The FBI revealed on October 21 that a comparison of dental records confirmed that the human remains – which police said consisted of bones – found at the alligator-and-snake-infested wildlife preserve were Laundrie’s.

In a statement released through the North Port Police Department Tuesday, Sarasota’s District 12 Medical Examiner said: “The identity of the remains found at the Carlton Reserve on October 20th was confirmed by comparison to know dental records of Brian Laundrie.”

“No DNA analysis has yet been performed on the remains. Samples will be submitted for DNA testing once the examination of the remains by the medical examiner’s office is complete,” the statement read.

The North Port Police Department said in its own statement on Twitter that it had received a number of calls “about a false report of DNA not matching Brian Laundrie.”

A lawyer for the Laundrie family has told Insider that an initial autopsy for Laundrie came back “inconclusive” and that his remains have been sent to a forensic anthropologist to be analyzed.

Laundrie, 23, was the sole person of interest in the disappearance and killing of his 22-year-old fiancée Gabby Petito.

Erin Kimmerle, an associate professor of anthropology at the University of South Florida, told Insider that using dental records to identify human remains is much faster than using DNA analysis.

Testing DNA “gets to be tricky because if the remains are so degraded that you can only get mitochondrial DNA, you have to send it off to another lab, and right now they have a year backlog,” Kimmerle said.